The Pressure for Water Conservation

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

The Pressure for Water Conservation

A compressed air-assisted flush water tank can consume 20% to 38% less water on average than a 1.6 gallon per flush (gpf) gravity toilet. Pressure-assisted or power flush toilets use a tank-in-tank design to propel additional water (i.e., 70 gallon per minute peak flow) into the bowl with each flush. The pressure-assisted flush system uses the existing pressure energy of the water supply to significantly improve toilet performance and minimize double flushes to clear waste.

In this design, when supply line water fills the compressed air-assisted flush water tank, the air is trapped and compressed. The air pressure builds until it is approximately equal to the water supply line pressure. At this point, the water flow stops and the compressed air-assisted flush water tank is ready for the next flush. Since it uses the same basic water supply pressure (20–25 psi or higher) as a conventional gravity-fed toilet, the developed air pressure is 20–25 psi or higher (minus the height of the water in the gravity-fed tank). The increased pressure pushes waste up to 33% further down the drain than the recommendations set by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI).

Uncompressed vs compressed air mechanism. Image courtesy of Flushmate.

Uncompressed vs compressed air mechanism. Image courtesy of Flushmate.

Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
Email us at [email protected]