Emergency Pressure for Tires

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Emergency Pressure for Tires

One of the few things worse than finding a flat tire on your car in the morning, is finding a flat tire after you have traveled to your destination. At home you might have a tire pump to inflate the tire and if the leak wasn’t too bad, you could drive to a location where the tire could be changed and repaired. Having a readily available source of pressure stored in your vehicle was not a viable option for most people.

With the Airmoto or one of its portable lightweight air compressor competitors, that situation has changed. Specifically, the AirMoto unit with package dimensions of 7.01 x 3.86 x 2.05 inches, weighs only 1.2 lbs. Capable of providing up to 120 psi to inflate most tires from cars to bicycles to trucks, the lithium battery powered unit can inflate a car tire in about 8 minutes. To allow the user to wait somewhere comfortable while the tire is inflating, the digital pressure gauge (displaying units in psi, bars, kPA or Kg/cm2) is set to the desired value (maximum value of 120 psi) and the pump turns off when that pressure is reached. At a price of $69 (or less for some competitive models), it is now easy and affordable to have emergency pressure available at all times.

AirMoto Portable Air Compressor

Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
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Check That Water and Oil

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities and you. In this blog we’ll be discussing the pressure in water and oil.

Check That Water and Oil

And don’t forget to check the tire pressure, too. A little over 50 years ago these were commonly used in the predecessors to today’s gas stations – service stations. In addition to pumping gas, the service station attendant would perform routine but often mandatory measurements. In those days, the reliability of vehicles would frequently require adding water, oil and air. Vehicle reliability has improved significantly since then. With today’s rugged and affordable sensors for pressure and other parameters, these and other measurements are performed continuously – the vehicle provides the service of monitoring itself for the driver and mechanics.

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Source: https://www.pinterest.com/pin/147774431494414724/

Common pressure sensor measurements in modern vehicles include engine oil pressure, tire pressure, side airbag pressure in crash detection systems, manifold absolute pressure, barometric pressure, seat occupancy pressure and more.

 What do you think/Comments?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let me know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
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Tire Pressure: Not all Measurements are the Same

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities and you. In this blog we’ll look at tire pressure measurements.

Tire Pressure: Not all Measurements are the Same

The proper tire pressure in passenger cars and trucks provides optimum safety and efficiency.  Since drivers did not check tire pressures as frequently as they needed to, the U.S. Department of Transportation’s (DOT’s) National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) Transportation Recall Enhancement, Accountability, and Documentation (TREAD) Act of 2000 requires a tire pressure monitoring system (TPMS) on every new vehicle (all passenger cars and light trucks under 10,000 lbs. Gross Vehicle Weight) sold in the U.S. after November 2006.

Not all tire pressure measurements are the same. Car tire pressures are typically 30 to 35 psi with truck values running slightly higher. If you have an ATV, the tire pressure could be more like 8 psi max with some being as low as 2.7 psi and some as high as 10 psi. If you ride a road bicycle, the pressure can range considerably and depends on your weight with tire pressures of 95-105 psi for 110# riders to 125-135 psi for a 230# rider suggested from one source.

You can find tire pressure measurements in some unusual places. The Shipwreck water slide at SeaWorld uses large tires to carry several riders. The tire bumps into the sides of the slide to provide added excitement to the ride. For safety purposes, a maximum rating of 2.9 psi or 0.2 bar is recommended.

Shipwreck water slide uses large tires

The variety of tire pressure readings means that a single pressure sensor cannot provide the required accuracy and precision for all applications.

What do you think/Comments?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let me know and I’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
-Dan DeFalco, Marketing Manager, All Sensors Corporation ([email protected])