Pressure in Wastewater Treatment

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Pressure in Wastewater Treatment

Water reuse or water recycling or water reclamation takes water from a variety of sources, treats it, and reuses it for agriculture and irrigation, potable water supplies, groundwater replenishment, industrial processes and environmental restoration. Removing impurities from wastewater and sewage requires the removal of all types of physical, chemical, and biological contaminations in Sewage Treatment Plants (STP). While the water may be treated to obtain any level of quality desired, as its purity increases, so does the cost of obtaining that purity.

In the U.S., the Safe Drinking Water Act and the Clean Water Act provide regulations to protect the quality of drinking water source waters, community drinking water, and waterbodies such as rivers and lakes. Moving the water between various processing stations in a treatment plant requires numerous pumps. Since contaminants are removed at different steps, there are many locations that could limit or restrict the water flow. In the secondary treatment of wastewater, Waste Activated Sludge (WAS) and Return Activated Sludge (RAS) as well as scum are among the different flowing constituents. For successful long-term operation, pressure sensing could occur at several points in the reclamation process.

St Petersburg Florida Water Reclamation Process Flow Diagram

The water reclamation process in the city of St. Petersburg, Florida identifies 11 pumps to achieve their desired water quality.
Image source:
water-reclamation-process-flow-diagram_medium.jpg (800×533) (usf.edu)

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Pressure Extremes in Weather

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Pressure Extremes in Weather

A cyclone is an area of low pressure where the winds flow counterclockwise in the Northern Hemisphere and clockwise in the Southern Hemisphere. Inside an intense tropical cyclone, called a hurricane or typhoon depending on the region, the barometric pressure at the ocean’s surface drops to extremely low levels. Unlike a tornado that forms over land and has a pressure drop of perhaps 194 mbar, when air is pulled into the eye of the hurricane, it draws moisture from the ocean. The air rises rapidly before condensing, cooling, and releasing large amounts of heat into the atmosphere then falls and begins the cycle again. Using the Saffir-Simpson scale to rate hurricanes, Category 1 hurricanes have a barometric pressure of greater than 980 millibars that cause minimal damage. In contrast, Category 5 hurricanes have a central pressure of less than 920 millibars and can cause excessive damage.

NASA’s Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) - CyloneSource: NASA’s Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM)

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Compression Treatment Pressure

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Compression Treatment Pressure

A machine that provides dynamic air compression can help users recover faster from an injury or improve their training and maximize their performance. For example, Hyperice’s Normatec 3 uses dynamic air compression to create 7 compression levels. Patented pulse technology delivers treatment to 5 overlapping zones and uses biomimicry to replicate the natural muscle pumps of the legs. Alternatively, a different attachment performs similar action to the arms.

Hyperice Normatec 3 Dynamic Air Compression Treatment

A computer-controlled compressor with digitally controlled valve system channels air to each zone. Each zone is inflated like an automatic blood pressure with a pressure range from 30 to 110 mmHg. Patented pulsing action occurs for an allotted amount of time at the set intensity level. ZoneBoost™ technology allows the user to increase the intensity of a single zone on the attachment by adding an extra 60 seconds of massage time as well as 10 mmHg increased pressure in the selected zone.

The sequential massage pattern begins by compressing the user’s feet, hands, or upper quad depending on which attachment is used. Each zone of the attachment compresses and then holds pressure. This process repeats for each zone of the attachment as the compression pattern works toward the user’s heart.

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Pressure Sensors and Safe Drinking Water Systems

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Pressure Sensors and Safe Drinking Water Systems

Surprisingly, with all the water on planet Earth, less than 1% of all water is fresh and accessible. To ensure a fresh water supply, International Standard / American National Standard “NSF/ANSI 61 Drinking Water System Components – Health Effects” was initially adopted in June 1988 and has been revised and updated frequently with the most recent version revised December 2021. This Standard establishes minimum health effects requirements for the chemical contaminants and impurities that are indirectly imparted to drinking water from products, components, and materials used in drinking water systems.

The standard defines a point-of-entry (POE) system as a system with a minimum initial clean-system flow rate of no less than 15 L/min at 103 kilopascals pressure drop and 18 ± 5 °C water temperature (not less than 4 gal/min at 15 psig pressure drop and 65 ± 10 °F water temperature) used to treat the water supply at a building or facility for drinking, washing, and flushing or for other non-consumption water supply purposes. A pressure sensor from All Sensors’ media isolated SPA 402 family could measure and verify these pressure levels as part of a safe water supply.

All Sensors | SPA 402 Series

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