Another Pressure Sensor Possibility: A Vacuum Cleaner

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities and you. In this blog we’ll look at a pressure application for vacuums.

Another Pressure Sensor Possibility: A Vacuum Cleaner

In hotels and several other types of commercial buildings, you have good chance of seeing a maintenance person using a Sensor S12 or S15 vacuum cleaner (or in this case, waiting to be put away). The industrial service vacuum cleaner has a bag full light that comes on when there is a reduction in airflow in the system from a clog or full bag; the machine has a 99.6% filtration rate at 0.3 microns. After 45 seconds to a minute, the machine shuts down to prevent excessive loading of the motor and ineffective cleaning. While a pressure sensor could be used to provide this functionality, an alternate technique is currently used.

 

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In fact, measuring the pressure drop in many airflow situations that need to be monitored and controlled for proper operation are a perfect application for low pressure sensors (frequently less than 1-inch of water such as the 1 INCH-D1-4V-MINI or 1 INCH-D2-BASIC) that can measure and accurately detect small pressure variations. With the right resolution pressure sensor, even more functionality can be provided to vacuum cleaners and critical airflow applications.

What do you think/Comments?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let me know and I’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
-Dan DeFalco, Marketing Manager, All Sensors Corporation ([email protected])

Standards for Pressure Sensing Applications

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities and you. In this blog we’ll look at standards used for pressure sensing applications.

Standards for Pressure Sensing Applications

Several standards exist for sensing pressure in automotive, medical, industrial, military and other applications.

In 1981, the Society of Automotive Engineers, now SAE International, published SAEJ1346 “Guide to Manifold Absolute Pressure Transducer Representative Test Method” and SAE J1347 “Guide to Manifold Absolute Pressure Transducer Representative Specification.” These documents use the manifold absolute pressure (MAP) sensor to provide guidelines for specifying and testing sensors in the recently developed engine control systems.

The Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation (AAMI) developed standards for blood pressure transducers in sphygmomanometers (SP10, 1987) and disposable blood pressure (BP22) applications. SP10 and BP22 are now American National Standards Institute (ANSI) standards as well: ANSI/AAMI SP10-1992 and ANSI/AAMI BP22:1994/(R)2006.

In 1993, the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) initiated a standards creating activity that has led to seven accepted and proposed standards addressing several aspects of smart sensors for industrial applications: IEEE Std 1451.1 to 1451.7. Pressure sensors are among the sensors covered in these documents.

In 2000, the U.S. Congress passed the Transportation Recall Enhancement Accountability and Documentation (TREAD) Act. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) of Department of Transportation (DOT) “Tire Pressure Monitoring System” FMVSS No. 138 addresses the requirements of this act.

These are some of the more well-known standards for pressure sensors. Additional standards that indicate requirements that a customer or government could impose on a pressure sensor used for a specific application include (but are by no means limited to):

MIL-STD 202G Method 105C Barometric Pressure (9/12/63) describes test procedures for barometric sensors used in high altitude aircraft.

The International Standards Organization (ISO) has several standards under ISO/TC 30/SC 2  – Pressure differential devices, as well as ISO 21750:2006, Road vehicles – “Safety enhancement in conjunction with the tyre inflation pressure monitoring” and others. ISO 15500-2:2012(en) Road vehicles — “Compressed natural gas (CNG) fuel system components” has two parts that specifically involve sensing pressure: Part 2: Performance and general test methods and Part 8: Pressure indicator.

NSF International has a certification program specifying safety and quality requirements for automotive in wheel tire pressure monitoring sensors for the aftermarkets parts industry.

ASTM International, formerly the American Society for Testing and Materials, has issued “Standard Specification for Transducers, Pressure and Differential, Pressure, Electrical and Fiber-Optic, Active Standard” ASTM F2070 that covers the requirements for pressure and differential pressure transducers for general applications.

The U.S Federal Drug Administration has issued “Non-Invasive Blood Pressure (NIBP) Monitor Guidance,” most recently updated in 2014.

Microsoft’s Object Linking and Embedding (OLE) standard is used in the OLE for Process Control (OPC) standards by the OPC Foundation to define requirements for interoperability in industrial automation systems.

What do you think/Comments?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let me know and I’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
-Dan DeFalco, Marketing Manager, All Sensors Corporation ([email protected])

Pressure Sensing in Healthcare

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog will bring out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities and you. This blog explores pressure sensing in healthcare.

Pressure Sensing in Healthcare

When we’re young, it seems that the thermometer is the essential measurement to determine well versus sick. As we age, pressure becomes increasingly important. Initially, it determines a proper blood pressure level—with less than 120 over 80 (mm Hg) being the desired range.

Proper eye care involves glaucoma testing that uses pressure to determine the onset of this disease. Normal intraocular pressures average between 12-22 mm Hg.

A common tool for detecting the onset of respiratory problems is the spirometer or pneumotachograph. In this case, the reading is airflow rate calculated from a change in pressure drop (∆P) during inhaling and exhaling and can also be used for indirect measurement of lung volumes and capacities. The actual differential pressure measurement is quite low, typically requiring a sensor with as low as ±500 P (±3.75 mm Hg) range to obtain acceptable resolution.

These are the more common pressure measurements that separate a heathy from a sick person. Those with health problems may learn the difference between in vivo and ex vivo pressure measurements, and the use of pressure measurements in respirators, ventilators and more.

What do you think/Comments?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let me know and I’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
-Dan DeFalco, Marketing Manager, All Sensors Corporation ([email protected])

Welcome to All Sensors Blog

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog will bring out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities and you. This initial blog explores pressure sensing in weather measurements.

Barometric or air pressure – either rising or falling – indicates a change in weather and is usually included in weather reports with temperature, rain or snowfall and wind measurements. While the temperature, rain and wind information is quickly verified by just going outside, the pressure measurement is a longer term issue. The absolute pressure measurement in inches of mercury for the U.S. is typically about 30.00 for a steady reading depending on height above sea level. The rate and amount of a falling barometer indicates how quickly a storm will occur and its severity. Barometric pressure change may be several days or only a few hours before the weather front. Accurate and precise pressure measurements need to consistently resolve a rather small pressure range since the pressure drop or rise from a steady barometer is usually within 00.20 inches of mercury.

What do you think/Comments?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let me know and I’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
-Dan DeFalco, Marketing Manager, All Sensors Corporation ([email protected])