Sandblasting Pressure

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Sandblasting Pressure

Removing paint, rust or an old finish from furniture and even polishing and finishing is less work with a sandblaster with the right abrasive and the right pressure. Small cabinet blasters often use pressures below 100 psi. In contrast, a heavy-duty sandblaster with a single-stage air compressor, air pressure over 120-150 psi is used to reduce the time involved. A pressure gauge is a common part of cabinet and portable sandblasters to obtain repeatable results.

Stark Tools 10 Gallon Air Sand Blaster

With a working pressure of 60 to 125 psi, this Stark Tools sandblaster has a 0 to 150 psi pressure gauge to obtain the desired operating pressure.
Image Courtesy of ToolPlanet.com

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Protecting MEMS Pressure Sensors with Parylene

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Protecting MEMS Pressure Sensors with Parylene

Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) pressure sensors provide accurate measurements for many applications. However, the top side of the piezoresistive MEMS pressure sensor die that has the sensing elements and potentially other circuitry cannot survive exposure to many common items that need to have their pressure measured — including water. To isolate the top surface of the pressure sensor die and other exposed circuitry, parylene is often used as a protective coating. Applied by a vapor deposition polymerization process, the parylene allows pressure to be transmitted to the top side of the pressure sensor to make measurements without damaging or impacting the reliability of the circuitry. The conformal, thin-film coating provides a moisture, chemical and dielectric barrier to protect the sensor’s critical circuitry in medical, automotive and other applications.

In fact, parylene extends the applications that a specific sensor design can address and is part of the packaging expertise that a sensor company may provide. Parylene coating can be found on a wide variety of All Sensors’ products. Specifically, parylene coating is available in all miniature digital product families such as the miniature digital DLVR, DLHR and DLLR Series as well as the millivolt output MLV series and the miniature digital and analog ELVR series.

All Sensors' E1BD Package

 

A protective parylene coating is an option for moisture/harsh media protection in the DLVR, DLHR and DLLR Series E1BD package.

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Pressurized

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Pressurized

When subjected to sufficient pressure in a closed container, some gases become liquids at normal temperatures. Called liquified gases, common liquified gases include: anhydrous ammonia, chlorine, propane, nitrous oxide and carbon dioxide. Equilibrium inside the tank means that the contents exists in a liquid-vapor balance state. In contrast, some gases, called non-liquified gases, including oxygen, nitrogen, helium and argon, do not become liquid even at very high pressures. However, with lower temperatures as well as higher pressure, some gases, such as oxygen, can be converted to a liquid. The differences in these processes are used for scientific, industrial and commercial purposes. At or above its critical temperature, no amount of pressure will cause the gas to liquefy. The minimum pressure required to liquefy a gas at its critical temperature is called the critical pressure. When pressure is an essential part of the process, both the pressure and the temperature are controlled and monitored.

Carbon dioxide pressure-temperature phase diagram

Carbon dioxide pressure-temperature phase diagram. Source: Wikipedia.

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Oxygen Tank Pressure

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Oxygen Tank Pressure

For many reasons, patients that require additional oxygen use storage tanks with compressed oxygen to supplement their normal air intake.  The size and subsequent capacity of the tank may vary but the full pressure is typically about 2,000 psi and can go as high as 3,000 psi. With this pressure level in the tank, a regulator converts the supplied pressure to a lower, and much safer, level for the user. With newer aluminum and other materials instead of steel to avoid magnetism problems in situations such Magnetic resonance Imaging (MRI) tests, the pressure level is lower. Minimum pressure in tanks is around 300 psi with delivery systems operating at pressure below 400 psi. In contrast, the storage and delivery system of liquid oxygen in a hospital, pressures are usually around 50.0–55.1 psi. The amount of oxygen present inside the cylinder is measured by the pressure at the outlet nozzle.

PV/T = constant

where P is pressure in the cylinder,

V is the volume of the cylinder,

and T is the temperature

Applied Home Healthcare Equipment

Image courtesy of Applied Home Healthcare Equipment.

Normal clean air contains 19% to 21% oxygen. In contrast, a supply of 60% oxygen with 40% nitrogen is considered acceptable for most clinical purposes but usually high much higher content is available.

Portable oxygen cylinders often have flow and pressure gauges. They provide easy, on sight measurements for a user. However, remote monitoring can use microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) pressure sensors to provide an electrical signal that can be transmitted to one or more receivers.  With this information displayed remotely, a variety of healthcare givers can access and use the information.

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Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
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