Tag Archives: pressure sensing

Fire Extinguisher Pressure

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Fire Extinguisher Pressure

Caution: Contents under pressure. The typical residential or consumer fire extinguisher comes with this warning and a pressure gauge to ensure that it is in a safe zone and prepared for use should the occasion arise.

An extinguisher designed for use with a dry chemical only (ABC powder) like the one on the left in the figure is pressurized to 195 psi (1,344 kPa). Its gauge is in the green zone indicating that it is ready use. The clockwise red zone indicates an overcharged situation that could measure as much as 400 psi (2,758 kPa). A counterclockwise measurement below the safe zone, like the one on the right, means the extinguisher has lost charge and needs to be recharged to be effective. With only three pressure readings available (0, 195 and 400 psi), significant interpolation is required to determine the pressure if the reading is outside of the set range. Since the operating pressure is 195 psi and the pressure could go as high as 400 psi, tanks are pressure tested at an even higher level such as 585 psi (4,033 kPa) to ensure that they are safe. For this testing and other measurments in the manufacturing process, an accurate electronic measurement with high resolution, like the All Sensors CPM 602 Series, could provide the answer.

Fire Extinguisher

Comments/Questions?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
Email us at info@allsensors.com

The Pressure for Safety in Gas Stations

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

The Pressure for Safety in Gas Stations

For safe fuel storage and delivery, frequent maintenance and monitoring of the equipment in gasoline stations is certainly advised and may be required by federal and/or local legislation. In addition to the hazards presented by leaks, they are also costly to the service station operation. In all instances, to prevent or detect problems, pressure measurements are essential.

For example, static pressure testing for fuel lines and gas stations requires a pressure gauge to ensure that everything is working properly and not leaking.  Test equipment to verify this performance can range from sophisticated and expensive to straightforward and cheap.

Gas Station Fuel Gauge

The 50 psi (345 kpa) static pressure reading. Note fuel in the gauge.

Stage II Vapor Recovery Control

For many years, Stage II Vapor Recovery Control in gas stations (aka gasoline dispensing facilities or GDFs) was required by many regions in the U.S. To quantify the vapor tightness of vapor recovery systems installed at GDFs equipped with pressure/vacuum (P/V) valves, the designed pressure setting of the P/V valves has to be a minimum of 2.5 inches of water column (inches H2O) to verify the 2-inch water closet (WC) static pressure performance of the system.

However, since the early 2000s, many vehicles have been equipped with onboard refueling vapor recovery (ORVR) systems. These ORVR controls have essentially eliminated the need for Stage II vapor recovery systems in service stations.

Comments/Questions?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
Email us at info@allsensors.com

The Pressures of a Modern Lifestyle

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

The Pressures of a Modern Lifestyle

After a restful night’s sleep, possibly in a water (<<28 mmHg) bed or on an air (<1 psi) mattress, the day begins with the flushing of a toilet, washing of hands and a relaxing shower. All these daily routines need adequate water pressure (40 to 45 psi). More water pressure is needed to get the filtered water (20-40 psi) for coffee. In many cases, the coffee is made by a pressurized (130.5 ± 14.5 psi) coffee/expresso machine. Before leaving home, a pressurized (10-100 psi) water-powered toothbrush could be used to clean the teeth.

The trip to work or wherever in a personal vehicle would almost always require riding on pressurized rubber tires whether it is a car, truck, motorcycle or even a bicycle (< 135 psi). If the vehicle is a car with an internal combustion engine, cylinder pressure provides the power to propel it and, in some cases, a turbocharger provides even more input air pressure. Hydraulic pressure provides the braking (800-2000 psi) and steering (80-125 psi).

Back at home after whatever the day has meant, it is cool thanks to the air conditioning compressor (<100 to >345 psi) and air delivery by the fan (1-in water column) through a clean air filter (<250 Pa). To relax, a pressurized bottle of liquid, perhaps a soda (30-50 psi), beer (<45 psi) or even sparkling wine (70-90 psi) is in order. With the stress of the day behind, your blood pressure (120/80 mmHg) and breathing (respiratory pressure) are probably the lowest they have been all day. Of course, the entire day occurred in atmospheric pressure whether it was near the ocean (14.7 psi) or in a mountain cabin at 1 mile above sea level (6.9 psi).

As another round of flushing, washing and brushing ends the day, the typical person is unaware of the value pressure has meant to their day to increase comfort, convenience and safety as well as save time and provide essential well-being. If they wanted to measure, monitor or control any of these or many other pressures, All Sensors has the pressure sensors to do the job.

Comments/Questions?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
Email us at info@allsensors.com

Pressure Sensing in Drones

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities and you. In this blog we’ll discuss the application of pressure sensing in drones.

Pressure Sensing in Drones

Aircraft of all sorts have different applications for pressure sensing. Drones in particular employ altimeters and barometers similar to even the most and least sophisticated aircraft. A basic surveillance drone can also use accelerometers, gyroscopes and magnetometers as well as cameras, temperature sensors and more.

The altimeter is an integral part of the altimeter control. While some drones have been developed and sold with ultrasonic sensors, pressure sensors improve the hovering mode of the most basic drones. With the altimeter, the air pressure in flight can be compared to the ground pressure for higher, safer operation of the drone.

Altimeters and barometers are mounted in protected internal compartments so their environment tolerance does not have to take into account external conditions that demand more rugged packaging. Recreational drones operating specifications fall well within the capabilities of commercial 100 kPa pressure sensors.

Other pressure sensor applications are found in other types of aircraft. For example, in light aircraft the simple form of an air speed indicator (ASI) measures the difference in pressure between the normal pressure around the craft and the increased pressure caused by propulsion. In more complex aircraft, pressure sensors can also monitor and help control the hydraulics, engine oil pressure and more.

With requests to expand the rules for drones from companies including Amazon, even the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is sensing drone pressure these days.

post13drones

What do you think/Comments?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let me know and I’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
-Dan DeFalco, Marketing Manager, All Sensors Corporation (ddefalco@allsensors.com)