Pressure for Clean Windows

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Pressure for Clean Windows

Cleaning the glass windows at ground level for a multistory building is a little more complicated than the usual window cleaning task that most people hate. While much safer and less complex than rigs that clean high-rise buildings, as much as a 40-foot piping or pole system is required to reach windows in a four-story building from ground level but over 70-foot long poles are available. In most cases, the extended length consists of smaller sections pre-assembled at the building site for each operation but in some instances, a telescoping technique is used, at least for the last section.

With the water being pumped up several feet, a significant pressure drop can occur. For a 40-ft length pole, 17.3 psi is lost with 21.6 psi dropped at 50 feet and a 30.3 psi drop at 70 feet. As part of the water supply, water is pre-filtered. It then goes through a pressurized tank with a sand-like resin, so normal residential or commercial water pressure is increased.

Water-Fed Pole Cleaning System

While the poles in a water-fed pole cleaning system are made of lightweight carbon fiber, it still takes some strength and balance to do the job.

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Pressure for Dancing Waters

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Pressure for Dancing Waters

Dancing waters, waltzing waters or other terms for describing the combination of colors and the motion of water in a fountain with several spouts rely on changes in and controlling the pressure for a defined time at each point in a water grid.

The computer-controlled systems consist of water, holding tanks, pumps to create pressure, solenoid operated valves, lighting and quite a few cleaver design tricks. For one of world’s most famous fountains, the one at the Bellagio in Las Vegas, uses only white lights. The number of sprayers and the height more than make up for the lack of color, especially with the majestic hotel in the background.

The fountain has over 1,200 sprayers that include 16 super jets that launch water 460 feet in finales. Called shooters by Wet Design that constructed the system, four different types of shooters are identified:

      • Programmable oarsman make the water dance up to 77 feet
      • Minishooters reach 100 feet
      • Supershooters achieve 240 feet and
      • Extreme-shooters can propel water up to 460 feet

Design aspects of each type vary but the SuperShooter has a 12-ft high holding tank, 1 foot in diameter that contains about 765 gallons. When air stored at 200 psi in 60-gallon receivers is released into the tank, the water climbs up to 240 feet. In contrast, smaller shooters with smaller tanks only require a few psi of air pressure to send water 10 to 12 ft into the air.

A water display on board a cruise ship A water display at sea on a cruise ship provides an interesting variation to moving water.

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Sandblasting Pressure

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Sandblasting Pressure

Removing paint, rust or an old finish from furniture and even polishing and finishing is less work with a sandblaster with the right abrasive and the right pressure. Small cabinet blasters often use pressures below 100 psi. In contrast, a heavy-duty sandblaster with a single-stage air compressor, air pressure over 120-150 psi is used to reduce the time involved. A pressure gauge is a common part of cabinet and portable sandblasters to obtain repeatable results.

Stark Tools 10 Gallon Air Sand Blaster

With a working pressure of 60 to 125 psi, this Stark Tools sandblaster has a 0 to 150 psi pressure gauge to obtain the desired operating pressure.
Image Courtesy of ToolPlanet.com

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Protecting MEMS Pressure Sensors with Parylene

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Protecting MEMS Pressure Sensors with Parylene

Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) pressure sensors provide accurate measurements for many applications. However, the top side of the piezoresistive MEMS pressure sensor die that has the sensing elements and potentially other circuitry cannot survive exposure to many common items that need to have their pressure measured — including water. To isolate the top surface of the pressure sensor die and other exposed circuitry, parylene is often used as a protective coating. Applied by a vapor deposition polymerization process, the parylene allows pressure to be transmitted to the top side of the pressure sensor to make measurements without damaging or impacting the reliability of the circuitry. The conformal, thin-film coating provides a moisture, chemical and dielectric barrier to protect the sensor’s critical circuitry in medical, automotive and other applications.

In fact, parylene extends the applications that a specific sensor design can address and is part of the packaging expertise that a sensor company may provide. Parylene coating can be found on a wide variety of All Sensors’ products. Specifically, parylene coating is available in all miniature digital product families such as the miniature digital DLVR, DLHR and DLLR Series as well as the millivolt output MLV series and the miniature digital and analog ELVR series.

All Sensors' E1BD Package

 

A protective parylene coating is an option for moisture/harsh media protection in the DLVR, DLHR and DLLR Series E1BD package.

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