Pressure Readings Aplenty in a Fire Truck

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Pressure Readings Aplenty in a Fire Truck

If you are coming to the rescue in a fire truck, you need to bring several pressure gauges. A recent trip to the local fire department brought this point home.

Firetruck Pressure Gauges

Two large pressure gauges in the upper left-hand corner for the supply line show the intake water pressure from a fire hydrant and output (master discharge pressure) from the pump on the vehicle and have a maximum reading capability of 400 psi. The next row shows the readings from seven valve-controlled stations that are monitored for their ability to respond when necessary. Note that the gauges are color coded to allow easy identification of a specific zone.

Analog gauges are easy to read and convenient for a fire fighter controlling the valves. However, microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) pressure sensors with digital readouts and ability to transmit those reading to another monitoring location could provide additional benefits to the fire fighters and the fire control process.

Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
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Propane Tank Pressure

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Propane Tank Pressure

Keeping warm in a mobile home or camper in the winter or enjoying an outdoor barbeque in the summer would be much more difficult without propane. Even patios can be made comfortable by a propane-powered heater. This highly portable energy form is typically conveyed and stored in one-pound, twenty-pound, 30-pound or 100-pound tanks.

Pressure Gauges

To know how much gas is in a consumer tank, especially one that is stored for a long time in between uses, pressure gauges with rather broad indicators are used. Green (full), yellow (low gas), and red (empty) bands display the fuel level and account for the variations due to different ambient temperatures.

Propane Tank Pressure Gauge

Unlike, natural gas appliances that operate at pressures around 7 inches of water column (WC) or 14.9 millibars, 1743 Pa, or about 0.25 psi (pounds per square inch, a common operating pressure range for propane (liquid petroleum or LP gas) appliances is 10 – 11 inches WC or 27.4 millibars, 2491 – 2739 Pa or about 0.36 – 0.40 psi.

Since the pressure in a propane tank can range between 100 and 200 psi, its pressure must be reduced and regulated for use in a home, motor home, camper or an outdoor gas appliance, typically to 10.5 inches water column.

Comments/Questions?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
Email us at [email protected]

Dealing with the Pressure in Storage Tanks

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities and you. In this blog we’ll be discussing the pressure in storage tanks.

Dealing with the Pressure in Storage Tanks

The weight of any liquid results in a pounds per square inch (PSI) or other values of pressure reading depending on the height of the fluid and its density. In addition, due to volatility, there can be additional pressure associated with a confined liquid. This is especially true for gasoline and other petroleum based fuels. For safety purposes, pressure readings are made at many locations in a fuel storage and transportation facility. For on the spot readings by an operator, many readings continue to be based on using mechanical pressure gauges. However, with the ease of wirelessly transmitting readings, and availability of pressure sensors that can handle interfacing to a media such as gasoline, fuel oil, diesel or others, the electronic data can be sent for remote collecting, monitoring and file keeping. Sensors such as All Sensors CPM 602 ceramic sensors can provide data from 30 to 6000 PSI.

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In the midst of complex material transfer plumbing in this storage facility, three pressure gauges are easily identified between valves and connections.

What do you think/Comments?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let me know and I’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
-Han Mai, Senior Marketing Specialist, All Sensors Corporation ([email protected])