Protecting MEMS Pressure Sensors with Parylene

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Protecting MEMS Pressure Sensors with Parylene

Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) pressure sensors provide accurate measurements for many applications. However, the top side of the piezoresistive MEMS pressure sensor die that has the sensing elements and potentially other circuitry cannot survive exposure to many common items that need to have their pressure measured — including water. To isolate the top surface of the pressure sensor die and other exposed circuitry, parylene is often used as a protective coating. Applied by a vapor deposition polymerization process, the parylene allows pressure to be transmitted to the top side of the pressure sensor to make measurements without damaging or impacting the reliability of the circuitry. The conformal, thin-film coating provides a moisture, chemical and dielectric barrier to protect the sensor’s critical circuitry in medical, automotive and other applications.

In fact, parylene extends the applications that a specific sensor design can address and is part of the packaging expertise that a sensor company may provide. Parylene coating can be found on a wide variety of All Sensors’ products. Specifically, parylene coating is available in all miniature digital product families such as the miniature digital DLVR, DLHR and DLLR Series as well as the millivolt output MLV series and the miniature digital and analog ELVR series.

All Sensors' E1BD Package

 

A protective parylene coating is an option for moisture/harsh media protection in the DLVR, DLHR and DLLR Series E1BD package.

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Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
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Pressure Sensors and the IoT

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Pressure Sensors and the IoT

The recently published “The Internet of Things (IoT) Sensors Market” report states, “In an Internet of Things ecosystem, two things are very important, the Internet and physical devices like sensors and actuators.” Based on the importance of the sensors, the report projects that the IoT sensors market will reach US$ 23.82 Billion by 2024, at a CAGR of 34.1% between 2018 and 2024.

The analysis includes pressure, temperature, humidity, magnetometer, gyroscope, accelerometer, image and inertial sensors. Segmented into wired and wireless pieces, the IoT sensor market report analyzes Consumer, Commercial, and Industrial market segments.

All Sensors' MEMS Pressure Sensors

Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) pressure sensors deliver the size, performance, power consumption and cost to satisfy many if not most of the IoT pressure sensing requirements. Based on the variety of measurements that they address, it should not surprise anyone that their data will be used in numerous monitoring and control applications – cloud based or otherwise.

Comments/Questions?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
Email us at info@allsensors.com

Pressure Makes Great Sparkling Wines

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Pressure Makes Great Sparkling Wines

Interested in a little taste of the bubbly? Well, why not? The effervescence adds a substantial taste difference to wine that many people enjoy. Opening a bottle may be a little tricky based on the pressure inside of it. Depending on the wine and the manufacturer, the pressure typically can range from 70 to 90 psi. That’s about five to over six times atmospheric pressure. No wonder the cork can fly across the room if the proper precautions are not taken.

Champagne Under Pressure

Source: https://www.finedininglovers.com/stories/champagne-bottle-secrets/

In Champagne and other sparkling wines, the pressure is created by carbon dioxide, which forms naturally as yeast interacts with grape sugars. Different fermenting, bottling methods and the type of grapes as well as aging are key factors in the actual pressure inside the bottle.

For example, the pressure in a Champagne bottle from France is about 6 bar (90 psi) and, in contrast, a bottle of Prosecco, from northeast Italy, has a pressure of about 3.5 bar (51 psi). Since it has to withstand more pressure, Champagne actually uses a heavier bottle, something a winery would want to know to avoid problems. While putting a pressure sensor on each bottle of wine is impractical, testing each manufactured bottle or at least verifying the manufacturing processes’ capability to consistently provide bottles that can withstand a maximum pressure is just a good manufacturing practice. For these applications, the accuracy and cost effectiveness of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) pressure sensors that can measure 100 psi certainly makes sense.

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Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
Email us at info@allsensors.com

 

Suction Solutions

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities and you.

Suction Solutions

Designers often look to nature for ideas that can be implemented in new products. Octopus suction cups provide an interesting pressure example.

When the octopus’ sucker is sealed to a surface, contraction of its radial muscles thins the wall of the sucker which tends to increase the enclosed volume.  However, the cohesiveness of water resists volume expansion and the pressure of the enclosed water decreases instead. With this mechanism, an octopus can create a pressure differential of 100-200 kPa (14.5-29 psi) at sea level and generate a significant amount of force.

Suction cups allow professional glazers to easily pick up and move large pieces of glass. One company offers a Vacuum Cup Octopus with Pump that can lift a maximum weight of 185 kg (407.9 lbs.) vertically with a 300-mm (11.8-in) diameter vacuum cup. One version includes a manual vacuum pump with a leak gauge to monitor the effectiveness of the suction.

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Source: Vacuum Cup Octopus with Pump

Vacuum suction cups offer a versatile method of material handling. In fact, suction cups also allow robots to pick different smooth surfaced objects. The approach has been applied to the robotics field since the 1960s. One recent research effort focuses on suction cups that can be used on robots designed to perform tasks in unstructured and contaminated environments. Of course, monitoring the amount of vacuum (negative pressure) with an accurate and rugged microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) pressure sensor can provide an even greater amount of control to more sophisticated suction applications.

Comments/Questions?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
Email us at info@allsensors.com