Pressure Readings Aplenty in a Fire Truck

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Pressure Readings Aplenty in a Fire Truck

If you are coming to the rescue in a fire truck, you need to bring several pressure gauges. A recent trip to the local fire department brought this point home.

Firetruck Pressure Gauges

Two large pressure gauges in the upper left-hand corner for the supply line show the intake water pressure from a fire hydrant and output (master discharge pressure) from the pump on the vehicle and have a maximum reading capability of 400 psi. The next row shows the readings from seven valve-controlled stations that are monitored for their ability to respond when necessary. Note that the gauges are color coded to allow easy identification of a specific zone.

Analog gauges are easy to read and convenient for a fire fighter controlling the valves. However, microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) pressure sensors with digital readouts and ability to transmit those reading to another monitoring location could provide additional benefits to the fire fighters and the fire control process.

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Pressure for Oxygen Therapy

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Pressure for Oxygen Therapy

Patients short of breath may need an oxygen concentrator to provide sufficient oxygen to make their breathing easier. Underlying health issues that could require the extra oxygen or oxygen therapy include asthma, lung cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), the flu and, most recently, COVID-19. Without requiring oxygen stored in tanks or containers, oxygen concentrators provide a continuous supply of oxygen that comes from the surrounding air.

Modern oxygen concentrators delivering about five to 10 liters of the gas per minute, typically at about 93% purity, are designed for either stationary (home) or portable usage. While a home oxygen concentrator may weigh less than 20 pounds, many portable oxygen concentrator models weigh less than 5 pounds.

Oxygen Concentrator

The oxygen concentrator uses a pump to compress the oxygen, filters or sieves to separate out nitrogen and other impurities, and pressure reducers to provide low pressure oxygen for patients to breath. With varying pressures and flow rates, different pressure sensors can be used at various points in the system. Any of the sensors for portable units need to be both small and light weight making microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) sensors ideal for these applications.

The low differential pressure measurements for flow are typically only a few kPA. Essentially, any of All Sensors DLHR, DLVR, ELVR, ELV and MLV series products that have respiratory pressure ranges will work for O2 concentrators in these ultra-low pressure applications.

All Sensors E1NJ Package

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Changes in the Forecast for Pressure Sensors?

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Changes in the Forecast for Pressure Sensors?

Similar to many other products, instead of growing in 2020, due to the impact of the COVID 19 pandemic, the pressure sensor market experienced a slight drop according to a recent market report. But recovery is in the forecast.  The global MEMS pressure sensor market is expected to grow at US$2.2 billion in 2026 having a 4% compound annual growth rate (CAGR) from 2019-2026 with the medical portion growing at the same CAGR.

In addition to their extensive use in automobiles, smartphones and industrial applications, the report acknowledges that the miniaturization of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) pressure sensors has allowed their use in invasive medical applications like blood pressure monitoring. Also, “Other niche medical markets like catheters, inflating device monitoring for cardiovascular applications that are invasive and require high accuracy, low-cost sensors, are fully using the advantages of MEMS technologies and could foster broader use in the medical market.”

The report states that as a mature technology, MEMS pressure sensors currently dominate the low-pressure market segment – under 10 bars (145 psi) – with piezoresistive technology continuing to be the main MEMS technology for the next five years. All Sensors piezoresistive MEMS pressure sensors are poised to take advantage of broader use in medical applications, especially in the ultra-low pressure from 0.1-inch H2O (0.0036 psi) full scale up to the 25-inch H2O (0.9 psi) area.

All Sensors Corporation's ELV Series Pressure Sensors

ELV Series digital and analog pressure sensor products.

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Fracking and Pressure

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Fracking and Pressure

In hydraulic fracturing or fracking, after a vertical shaft is dug from 1 to 2 miles deep in the earth to locate natural gas or oil, horizontal drilling occurs that can extend up to a mile from the vertical shaft. With the fracking well encased in steel and/or cement to prevent leakage into ground water, a fracking fluid is pumped down the well at pressures that can exceed 9,000 pounds per square inch (psi) or 62,050 kilopascals (kPA). This pressure can fracture the surrounding rock and create fissures and cracks for oil and gas flow. According to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), about 13,000 new wells are drilled every year.

The Fracking Process

The fracking process: pressures ≤ 90,000 psi. Figure courtesy of Friends of the Earth.

 

With concerns over the consequences of fracking, many people’s blood pressure increases when the topic of fracking is discussed. Unlike, fracking pressures themselves, this pressure measurement is perfect for microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) pressure sensors.

Blood Pressure

The results of fracking discussions: higher blood pressures ≥ 120-mm Hg. Figure courtesy of Shutterstock.

Comments/Questions?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
Email us at [email protected]