Under Pressure

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Under Pressure

“Pressure, pushing down on me, pressing down on you.” Queen & David Bowie

Great song and, perhaps, a fitting summary for 2020. Adios, 2020! However, pressure, or more appropriately, the stress due to many traumatic moments of daily life, gets a bad rap, since we actually rely on pressure for a variety of life-enabling, life-sustaining and life-enhancing functions. Several of these have been addressed in previous “Put the Pressure on US” blogs. See: “The Pressures of Daily Life on Earth” and “The Pressures of a Modern Lifestyle” for more examples of pressures experienced every day.

Freddie Mercury and David Bowie sing Under Pressure

Freddie Mercury and David Bowie sing Under Pressure.
Source: YouTube.

To deal with the very real pressures of daily living, you need a wide variety of pressure sensors to measure, monitor and control air and a variety of gases, water and a variety of other liquids as well as numerous human body pressures. From low (<5 cmH2O) to high (<500 psi and even <6000 psi) pressures in  well-controlled to hostile environments, All Sensors offers 52 series of pressure sensors with a variety of outputs including basic, millivolt and amplified analog as well as digital to address these real pressures, including breathing.

All Sensors Corporation Low and Ultra-Low Pressure Sensors

Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
Email us at info@allsensors.com

The Pressure for Ventilators

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

The Pressure for Ventilators

In addition to the pressure to get more ventilators, pressure is an integral part of a ventilator’s operation. Breathing involves inspiratory (inhaling) pressure and expiratory (exhaling) pressure and a ventilator has to take the user’s values into account. Peak Inspiratory Pressure or PIP is the maximum pressure inside the lungs during each inhaled breath and the normal range is 25-30 cm H2O. Positive End Expiratory Pressure or PEEP is the amount of pressure left inside the lungs at the end of a breath to keep the alveoli, tiny air sacs of the lungs, open. The normal range is 3-5 cm H2O.

The pressure inside a patient’s lungs depends on the compliance of their lungs. While the suggested range of pressures during ventilation is 20-35 cm H2O with an absolute maximum of 40 cm H2O, someone with damaged lungs may need a higher pressure.

 

Airway pressure and flow waveforms during constant flow volume control ventilation show PEEP and PIP

Airway pressure and flow waveforms during constant flow volume control ventilation show PEEP and PIP.
Source: http://rc.rcjournal.com/content/59/11/1773/tab-figures-data

With pressures below 50 cm H2O (19.7 in H2O or 4,903 Pa) for dynamic measurements, a pressure sensor designed specifically for these low pressures, such as All Sensors’ DLC, DLLR, and others, provide the required accuracy.

Comments/Questions?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
Email us at info@allsensors.com

Pressure and the Polar Vortex

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Pressure and the Polar Vortex

It’s baaack. It has been 4 years since a polar vortex disruption brought artic weather to the Northern Hemisphere. In the 2014-2015 winter, it meant historically cold temperatures and high snowfall in many areas.

While a polar vortex (a large area of low pressure and cold air that surrounds both of the Earth’s poles) always exits, other weather conditions can disrupt it and cause its effect to spread. Normally, the counter-clockwise (vortex) airflow keeps the colder air near the pole. The disruption is detected by pressure measurements in the stratosphere – not a ground level. While, a variety of pressure levels are used to mark its position, the 50 mb pressure surface is most often used to identify its location.

Weather.gov - Polar Vortex

Source: https://www.weather.gov/safety/cold-polar-vortex

Comments/Questions?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
Email us at info@allsensors.com

Check That Water and Oil

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities and you. In this blog we’ll be discussing the pressure in water and oil.

Check That Water and Oil

And don’t forget to check the tire pressure, too. A little over 50 years ago these were commonly used in the predecessors to today’s gas stations – service stations. In addition to pumping gas, the service station attendant would perform routine but often mandatory measurements. In those days, the reliability of vehicles would frequently require adding water, oil and air. Vehicle reliability has improved significantly since then. With today’s rugged and affordable sensors for pressure and other parameters, these and other measurements are performed continuously – the vehicle provides the service of monitoring itself for the driver and mechanics.

post 52

Source: https://www.pinterest.com/pin/147774431494414724/

Common pressure sensor measurements in modern vehicles include engine oil pressure, tire pressure, side airbag pressure in crash detection systems, manifold absolute pressure, barometric pressure, seat occupancy pressure and more.

 What do you think/Comments?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let me know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
– info@allsensors.com