Pressure for a Safe Installation

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Pressure for a Safe Installation

When an old heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) unit is past its prime, it’s time to bring in the experts.  Before the HVAC experts can apply their skills, the unit must be safely moved from the truck that brought it to its ultimate mounting location. This involves several safety protocols including solidly anchoring the truck and its crane, carefully attaching the cable to lift and move the unit, monitoring both the angle of the arm and amount of weight being lifted and, finally, avoiding sway. While several of these aspects, especially the last one, are ensured by the expertise of the operator, a pressure measurement from a load meter tells the operator that the load is withing the safe lifting capabilities of the crane including its hydraulics.

HVAC Unit Replacement Process

Safely lifting and moving the HVAC unit includes monitoring the weight of the load through a pressure measurement. In this case, the UNIC gauge provides the weight in 1000# and hydraulic pressure in psi with a red line at 3,000 psi.

Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
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Pressure in HVAC Systems

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Pressure in HVAC Systems

While addressing COVID-19 health issues and getting back to normal, one of the major concerns, especially for education, is acceptable ventilation.

Unfortunately, due to COVID-19, one of the leading conferences in this area, the Michigan Industrial Ventilation Conference, will not be held this year. In its place, a series of webinars facilitated by conference instructors will cover the fundamentals of industrial ventilation.

As noted in the seminar description for the first of the these webinars that will start March 3, pressure, as  well as temperature, elevation, and moisture content impacts an airstream’s density and density factor.

Another webinar will specifically address difficult testing situations and detail selection methods for providing the most accurate representation of pressure and airflow possible. Yet another will cover techniques and equipment for monitoring industrial ventilation systems to ensure that the system operates properly.

Those interested in more information on alternatives being offered to the 2021 conference should click here.

All Sensors Corporation MAMP Series P1NS Package

Those who are interested in accurate pressure sensors in the low-pressure range to detect clogged filters and airflow in HVAC systems should consider All Sensors MAMP Series of calibrated amplified output that can address 5 to 120 cmH2O measurements.

Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
Email us at [email protected]

Fan Static Pressure

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Fan Static Pressure

Fan static pressure is one of the two parameters that define the performance of a fan. The other, and more common, is the volume of air the fan delivers per minute or per hour. Fan static pressure is the resistance pressure the fan has to blow against to move air in the desired direction.

For PC gamers, high airflow and high-pressure static fans are two distinct classifications. High-pressure static fans are used on radiators, central processing unit (CPU) and graphic processing unit GPU coolers, in front of hard drives, and other places where airflow might otherwise be blocked by an object. Because of their high-pressure capability, they can overcome the restrictions caused by the blockage.

Cooler Master Masterfan Pro 120 Air Pressure Fan

The Masterfan Pro 120 Air Pressure Fan is ideal for funneling concentrated air short distances at hot components or through tight spaces.  Image courtesy of Cooler Master.

In wood drying operations, kiln static pressure is not a constant and depends upon the performance of the fan chosen. For example, replacing a small fan generating 45,000 cubic feet per minute (cfm) at an estimated pressure of 0.5 inches H2O in a kiln with a larger fan rated at 60,000 cfm at 0.5 inches of H2O will not achieve 60,000 cfm. The actual air flow will be less than 60,000 cfm due to the rise in the static pressure – a situation that can cause complications in the end application.

In heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) systems, static pressure measures the effectiveness of the fan to the ducts in a particular installation.  If the static pressure is too high, the HVAC unit will have to work harder to push the air through the duct work.

In all of these low-pressure situations, an accurate microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) pressure sensor with a digital output, such as All Sensors DLLR Series, can address the manufacturing, installation verification or ongoing operation measurements.

Comments/Questions?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
Email us at [email protected]

Controlling Building Pressure

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities and you. In this blog we’ll discuss proper indoor versus outdoor pressure in commercial buildings.

Controlling Building Pressure

Proper indoor versus outdoor pressure is important in commercial buildings. When indoor pressure is less than the outside pressure, outdoor air leaks, or infiltrates into the building. In addition to impacting heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) effectiveness, excessive infiltration can also cause uncomfortable drafts, especially in stairways, as well possible odor migrations and even encourage microbial growth depending on the outside weather conditions.

The opposite pressure condition, exfiltration, occurs when indoor pressure is greater than the outside pressure, indoor air leaks out of, or exfiltrates from the building. Excessive exfiltration negatively impacts temperature control by reducing supply airflow into occupied spaces, makes opening and closing doors difficult and creates noisy high-velocity airflow around doors and windows.

In addition to the operation of its mechanical ventilation system, a building’s pressure can be positive or negative due to the impact of wind and weather. Using either a return fan or a relief fan, for direct control of building pressure, manages the combined effects of weather, wind, and mechanical ventilation. This control requires pressure sensors mounted inside and outside of the building to determine the actual pressure difference. Depending on the desired exfiltration and infiltration goals, the pressure difference is typically less than 0.1-inch water gauge (wg) and can be either positive or negative.

What do you think/Comments?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let me know and I’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
-Dan DeFalco, Marketing Manager, All Sensors Corporation ([email protected])