Pressure for an Uplifting Experience

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Pressure for an Uplifting Experience

Using pressure wisely often creates an effective solution to both common and not-so-common problems. In fact, for engineers, asking “how can pressure help me solve this problem?” could be an inspirational technique for out of the box thinking.

Case in point. A young blogger wants to make a TikTok-like video showing her flying. How can hydraulic pressure make this happen? The answer is a Bobcat with a skid-steer telescopic attachment (maximum 3,000 psi capability) that is long enough to be positioned out of the picture.

Pressure for an Uplifting Experience

While a 13-year-old girl is a trivial load for a crane that can handle a 1500-pound maximum payload, when the max rated load is near, it is important to know that the rating capability of the hydraulic system is ensured by verification and even quality control testing.

This is where pressure sensors, like All Sensors CPM 602 Series that can handle up to 6,000 psi, provide the answer. In fact, whenever the question is “how can pressure help me solve this problem?” All Sensors has pressure sensors to help make the right decision.

Pressure for an Uplifting Experience

To see the end results, click here.

Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
Email us at info@allsensors.com

Water Pistol Pressure

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Water Pistol Pressure

Q. How do you elevate the basic water pistol experience?

A. By giving it more pressure.

Operating similar to the opposite of a hydraulic jack, a common water pistol employs Pascal’s Principle for a fluid at rest in a closed container: a pressure change in one part is transmitted without loss to every portion of the fluid and to the walls of the container. In equation form, it’s:

P1=F1/A1=P2=F2/A2

For the pressure to remain constant, if A1=n*A2, then F1=n*F2.

SuperSoaker water pressure

To take the water pistol to the next level, NASA engineer Lonnie Johnson conceived of the idea of a pressurized water gun with a pressure reservoir that became the Super Soaker. The ultimate Super Soaker used a constant pressure system (CPS) with a separate compression chamber that contained a thick-walled rubber balloon.

While the difference in the length and amount of the output (flow) of a standard water pistol vs. the Super Soaker vs. the CPS 2000 Mark1 Super Soaker is discussed in several blogs, the pressure in each is not. Those interested in pressure will just have to make their own measurements. All Sensors’ SPM 401 Series or CPM 602 Series pressure sensors with media isolation could provide those measurements.

Comments/Questions?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
Email us at info@allsensors.com

Dealing with the Pressure in Storage Tanks

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities and you. In this blog we’ll be discussing the pressure in storage tanks.

Dealing with the Pressure in Storage Tanks

The weight of any liquid results in a pounds per square inch (PSI) or other values of pressure reading depending on the height of the fluid and its density. In addition, due to volatility, there can be additional pressure associated with a confined liquid. This is especially true for gasoline and other petroleum based fuels. For safety purposes, pressure readings are made at many locations in a fuel storage and transportation facility. For on the spot readings by an operator, many readings continue to be based on using mechanical pressure gauges. However, with the ease of wirelessly transmitting readings, and availability of pressure sensors that can handle interfacing to a media such as gasoline, fuel oil, diesel or others, the electronic data can be sent for remote collecting, monitoring and file keeping. Sensors such as All Sensors CPM 602 ceramic sensors can provide data from 30 to 6000 PSI.

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In the midst of complex material transfer plumbing in this storage facility, three pressure gauges are easily identified between valves and connections.

What do you think/Comments?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let me know and I’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
-Han Mai, Senior Marketing Specialist, All Sensors Corporation (hmai@allsensors.com)

Media Isolated Pressure Sensors

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities and you. In this blog we’ll be discussing media isolated pressure sensors.

Media Isolated Pressure Sensors

Unlike many other sensor applications, pressure sensors frequently have to contact some pretty nasty chemicals. Sensor manufacturers usually qualify their sensors for restricted usage with statements such as “intended for use with non-corrosive, non-ionic working fluids such as air, dry gases, etc.” This means that the user who has an application that does not meet these criteria, either cannot use a product that meets all the other application requirements or has to take steps to protect the sensor and assume any risk regarding the protection methodology.

In contrast, sensors designed specifically for harsh environments open many new applications in areas including medical, environmental controls, plant and mechanical engineering as well as automotive. In many cases, the technology changes for these more rugged sensors from a silicon, microelectromechanical system (MEMS) material to a ceramic material but still retains a monolithic design. A flush membrane makes it easy to interface these types of pressure sensors to hydraulic fluids and even extends the pressure range up to 6000 PSI. With the CPM 602 series, All Sensors now participates in these more demanding applications.

CPM 602

A ceramic pressure sensor overcomes many of the limitations of silicon-based MEMS pressure sensors.

What do you think/Comments?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let me know and I’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
-Han Mai, Senior Marketing Specialist, All Sensors Corporation (hmai@allsensors.com)