The Pressures of Daily Life on Earth

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities and you. In this blog we’ll discuss pressures at sea level.

The Pressures of Daily Life on Earth

To get away from the usual routine and day to day stress, it’s great to take a summer vacation. Many people, even those in the center of the country, like to go on a seaside vacation near an ocean. For those concerned about pressure, at sea level the barometric pressure is 1 atmosphere (14.7 psi, 101 kPa, 29.9 in. Hg, or 760 mm Hg).

Surprisingly, the pressure at sea level is higher than most places on earth. At the top of Mt. Everest (altitude 29,029 feet or 8,848 m), the highest elevation in the world, the summit pressure of 251–253 Torr (33.5 to 33.7 kPa or 4.84 to 4.89 psi) is about 1/3rd of sea level based on measurements made from May to October. (For altitude pressure calculations, click here.) While the pressure is considerably less than sea level or anywhere else on earth, in spite of the exhilaration of being on top of the world, the stress level has to be incredibly high.

In contrast, the Mariana trench at the bottom of the ocean in the western Pacific Ocean is 35,814 feet (or 10.9 km) below sea level and the pressure is about 1.1 × 108 Pa (16,000 psi) or over  1000 atmospheres. That is serious pressure and only three human beings have made the trip. (For under water pressure calculations, click here.)

Compared to the extreme alternatives, a sea side vacation seems like a reasonable way to escape the pressures of daily life.

What do you think/Comments?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let me know and I’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
-Dan DeFalco, Marketing Manager, All Sensors Corporation (ddefalco@allsensors.com)

Welcome to All Sensors Blog

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog will bring out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities and you. This initial blog explores pressure sensing in weather measurements.

Barometric or air pressure – either rising or falling – indicates a change in weather and is usually included in weather reports with temperature, rain or snowfall and wind measurements. While the temperature, rain and wind information is quickly verified by just going outside, the pressure measurement is a longer term issue. The absolute pressure measurement in inches of mercury for the U.S. is typically about 30.00 for a steady reading depending on height above sea level. The rate and amount of a falling barometer indicates how quickly a storm will occur and its severity. Barometric pressure change may be several days or only a few hours before the weather front. Accurate and precise pressure measurements need to consistently resolve a rather small pressure range since the pressure drop or rise from a steady barometer is usually within 00.20 inches of mercury.

What do you think/Comments?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let me know and I’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
-Dan DeFalco, Marketing Manager, All Sensors Corporation (ddefalco@allsensors.com)