Changes in the Forecast for Pressure Sensors?

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Changes in the Forecast for Pressure Sensors?

Similar to many other products, instead of growing in 2020, due to the impact of the COVID 19 pandemic, the pressure sensor market experienced a slight drop according to a recent market report. But recovery is in the forecast.  The global MEMS pressure sensor market is expected to grow at US$2.2 billion in 2026 having a 4% compound annual growth rate (CAGR) from 2019-2026 with the medical portion growing at the same CAGR.

In addition to their extensive use in automobiles, smartphones and industrial applications, the report acknowledges that the miniaturization of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) pressure sensors has allowed their use in invasive medical applications like blood pressure monitoring. Also, “Other niche medical markets like catheters, inflating device monitoring for cardiovascular applications that are invasive and require high accuracy, low-cost sensors, are fully using the advantages of MEMS technologies and could foster broader use in the medical market.”

The report states that as a mature technology, MEMS pressure sensors currently dominate the low-pressure market segment – under 10 bars (145 psi) – with piezoresistive technology continuing to be the main MEMS technology for the next five years. All Sensors piezoresistive MEMS pressure sensors are poised to take advantage of broader use in medical applications, especially in the ultra-low pressure from 0.1-inch H2O (0.0036 psi) full scale up to the 25-inch H2O (0.9 psi) area.

All Sensors Corporation's ELV Series Pressure Sensors

ELV Series digital and analog pressure sensor products.

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Pressure and Hydro-Pneumatic Tanks

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Pressure and Hydro-Pneumatic Tanks

Hydro-pneumatic tanks are designed to store water and air under pressure. With stored air pressure, this type of water storage does not require the constant use of a pump, saving energy and wear and tear on the pump, while quickly providing water on demand. Separated by a diaphragm, the 30 to 50 psi system is pre-charged (pre-pressurized) to 25 psi in the air portion and should be 2 psi below the pump start-up pressure.

The system has four operating cycles based on pressure. The start-up cycle occurs when the pressure is 28 psig and the diaphragm is pressed against the bottom of the air chamber. In the fill cycle, water is pumped into the tank’s reservoir forcing the diaphragm upward into the air chamber, exceeding 40 psig. A pressure of 50 psig initiates the hold cycle shutting off the pump. At this point, the diaphragm is at its highest position and the water reservoir is filled to capacity. During the delivery cycle, the pump stays off (until 40 psig is reached) while pressure in the air chamber forces the diaphragm downward to deliver water with a system pressure of 40 to 50 psig.

For safe operation, a maximum 100 psig is specified for some models.

A O Smith Hydro-pneumatic Well Tank

Image source: A O Smith at Lowes

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A Pressure Treat

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

A Pressure Treat

Pressure treating wood stabilizes its dimensions, protects it from insects, increases its resistance to water and chemicals and reduces cracking. The pressure treating process involves both vacuum and pressure. Initially, a vacuum removes the air from the cavities in the wood to create space for the preservation solution. The vacuum levels in a given process vary but could range from -700 mmHg to -730 mmHg.

Then, a protective solution, commonly alkaline copper quat or ACQ, is forced deep into the wood under high pressure in an autoclave.  A hydraulic overpressure of 12 atmospheres or somewhere between 100 and 200 psig is common.

In general, the basic procedure consisting of initial vacuum, filling, application of pressure, discharging the solution, recovery vacuum and return to atmospheric pressure at the end of a cycle.

In the United States, the chemical protection from applying high pressure (in psi) is measured in the pounds of chemical per cubic foot (PCF) increase in the density of the wood. The density ranges from 0.40 PCF for ground contact to 0.60 PCF for foundations.

Pressure Treated WoodA basic pressure treating process uses pressure and vacuum.
Source: Nash by Gardener Denver.

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Inflating a Nose Balloon

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Inflating a Nose Balloon

Recently, a friend told me about a harrowing healthcare experience he just had and how pressure came to the rescue. It turns out he suffered about four broken nose experiences when he played sports in high school. In each instance, the coach reset the breaks. Compounded by the effect of high pressure that can be exerted when excessively blowing the nose over many years and other factors, he suddenly had a massive nose bleed (or epistaxis in clinical terms). The bleeding was at the back (posterior as opposed to anterior chamber) of the nose. To stop the profuse bleeding, the doctor inflated a silicone balloon catheter. Although it is a non-surgical procedure, it turned out to be quite painful, since over 120 mmHg pressure had to be exerted to stop the blood flow.

Invotec Silicone Epistaxis BalloonInvotec Silicone Epistaxis Balloon.
Image source: Invotec International.

In contrast, with balloon sinuplasty, a thin balloon catheter is inserted into the nose and the balloon is gradually inflated to relieve blockages and widen the sinus pathways, rather than stop bleeding.

In either case, pressure provides the solution to these health issues.

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