Piezoresistive MEMS Pressure Sensors Growth

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Piezoresistive MEMS Pressure Sensors Growth

A new report is available for pressure sensors from MarketResearch titled, “Pressure Sensor Market by Technology Advancement, Growth and Forecasts 2027.”

Over the forecast period, increasing technological advancements in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology as well as the rising adoption of this technology in connected devices are key factors driving growth. Of the analyzed technologies of piezoresistive, electromagnetic, capacitive, resonant solid state, and optical, piezoresistive technology is expected to enjoy the highest share in the market during this timeframe. Factors inhibiting growth include technical problems in integration and packaging processes and lack of a standard fabrication process.

While the market is segmented into automotive, oil & gas, consumer electronics, medical, industrial sector, and others, consumer electronics are expected to register significant share of revenue growth over the forecast period.

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The Ups and Downs of Pressure

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

The Ups and Downs of Pressure

Higher and lower pressures can occur in what seem like unusual circumstances.  In plumbing, for example, much higher pressures occur if air gets into a water line and the faucet is closed quickly. Called water hammer, the effect causes audible noise or the banging of pipes. The hydraulic shock wave can, in some cases, cause severe damage since the pressure is so high. Draining the system is the usual solution to this problem.

On the down side, many people are surprised when they open a refrigerator door, close it and then try to immediately reopen it. The negative pressure in the refrigerator caused by this activity can be so extensive in well-sealed systems that it takes significant forced to re-open the door. The decreased pressure results from cooling of the warmer air entering the refrigerator. Based on ideal gas law, the pressure decrease could be 10% or more. In deep freezer units and those with the best sealing, the effect is even stronger producing even lower pressures.

Ideal gas law: P V = n R T

Where: P is the pressure, V is the volume occupied by n moles of any gas at temperature (T) in Kelvin and R is the gas constant.

Central Restaurant Products Walk-In Freezer

Walk In Freezer courtesy of Central Restaurant Products.

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Pressure and the Polar Vortex

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Pressure and the Polar Vortex

It’s baaack. It has been 4 years since a polar vortex disruption brought artic weather to the Northern Hemisphere. In the 2014-2015 winter, it meant historically cold temperatures and high snowfall in many areas.

While a polar vortex (a large area of low pressure and cold air that surrounds both of the Earth’s poles) always exits, other weather conditions can disrupt it and cause its effect to spread. Normally, the counter-clockwise (vortex) airflow keeps the colder air near the pole. The disruption is detected by pressure measurements in the stratosphere – not a ground level. While, a variety of pressure levels are used to mark its position, the 50 mb pressure surface is most often used to identify its location.

Weather.gov - Polar Vortex

Source: https://www.weather.gov/safety/cold-polar-vortex

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Fan Static Pressure

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Fan Static Pressure

Fan static pressure is one of the two parameters that define the performance of a fan. The other, and more common, is the volume of air the fan delivers per minute or per hour. Fan static pressure is the resistance pressure the fan has to blow against to move air in the desired direction.

For PC gamers, high airflow and high-pressure static fans are two distinct classifications. High-pressure static fans are used on radiators, central processing unit (CPU) and graphic processing unit GPU coolers, in front of hard drives, and other places where airflow might otherwise be blocked by an object. Because of their high-pressure capability, they can overcome the restrictions caused by the blockage.

Cooler Master Masterfan Pro 120 Air Pressure Fan

The Masterfan Pro 120 Air Pressure Fan is ideal for funneling concentrated air short distances at hot components or through tight spaces.  Image courtesy of Cooler Master.

In wood drying operations, kiln static pressure is not a constant and depends upon the performance of the fan chosen. For example, replacing a small fan generating 45,000 cubic feet per minute (cfm) at an estimated pressure of 0.5 inches H2O in a kiln with a larger fan rated at 60,000 cfm at 0.5 inches of H2O will not achieve 60,000 cfm. The actual air flow will be less than 60,000 cfm due to the rise in the static pressure – a situation that can cause complications in the end application.

In heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) systems, static pressure measures the effectiveness of the fan to the ducts in a particular installation.  If the static pressure is too high, the HVAC unit will have to work harder to push the air through the duct work.

In all of these low-pressure situations, an accurate microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) pressure sensor with a digital output, such as All Sensors DLLR Series, can address the manufacturing, installation verification or ongoing operation measurements.

Comments/Questions?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
Email us at info@allsensors.com