Pressure Extremes in Weather

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Pressure Extremes in Weather

A cyclone is an area of low pressure where the winds flow counterclockwise in the Northern Hemisphere and clockwise in the Southern Hemisphere. Inside an intense tropical cyclone, called a hurricane or typhoon depending on the region, the barometric pressure at the ocean’s surface drops to extremely low levels. Unlike a tornado that forms over land and has a pressure drop of perhaps 194 mbar, when air is pulled into the eye of the hurricane, it draws moisture from the ocean. The air rises rapidly before condensing, cooling, and releasing large amounts of heat into the atmosphere then falls and begins the cycle again. Using the Saffir-Simpson scale to rate hurricanes, Category 1 hurricanes have a barometric pressure of greater than 980 millibars that cause minimal damage. In contrast, Category 5 hurricanes have a central pressure of less than 920 millibars and can cause excessive damage.

NASA’s Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) - CyloneSource: NASA’s Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM)

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