Pressure in a Wind Tunnel

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Pressure in a Wind Tunnel

With their pioneering efforts in powered flight on December 17, 1903, the Wright Brothers had to take their airplane to Kitty Hawk, North Carolina to prove that it worked. The craft initially flew at an airspeed of 34 mph. However, before that day in December, they had performed air tunnel testing.  Their 1901 wind tunnel design provided an airflow of about 30 mph and balance instruments that they designed and built measured lift and drag to test their concepts on portions of the design.

Today, wind tunnels are essential to test any aircraft or modifications to an aircraft prior to an actual flight test. With classifications of low-speed or high-speed (as well as subsonic, transonic, supersonic, hypersonic and hypervelocity), air velocity in a closed-circuit design is controlled by changing the speed of the rotating fans or by adjusting the angle of the fan blades. Other measurements include pressure, temperature, and humidity of the air as well as force.

In 2018, wind tunnel testing was performed on a model Vimana aircraft design created from Indian Sanskrit writings over 1,800 years ago. A model pressure of -0.055” H2O was measured in a 56 mile per hour wind and force measurements indicated that the design was very stable.

Ancient Aliens: Vimana Model Aircraft Experiment (Season 12, Episode 11))Wind tunnel testing of an aircraft design from ancient Indian writings.
Source: YouTube (Ancient Aliens: Vimana Model Aircraft Experiment (Season 12, Episode 11))

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Sensors Converge 2022

All Sensors is exhibiting at Sensors Converge 2022 with our parent company, Amphenol Sensor Technology Group.

Sensors Converge 2022

Please stop by Booth #424 at the McEnery Convention Center in San Jose from June 28 – 29, 2022 to say ‘hi’ and learn more about All Sensors!

Pressure and Steaming

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Pressure and Steaming

A steamer is used to simplify the removal of window tint from a vehicle’s windows or to facilitate the removal of wallpaper or to quickly and easily remove wrinkles from clothing. In any case, the process is rather straightforward. Water heated in the steamer produces steam. Using the pressure that builds up during heating, the steam is then emitted from the steam head toward the target area.

Similar to any sealed unit that heats water, also known as a boiler, the amount of pressure that builds up must be controlled for safe operation of the steamer. For example, in a Jiffy Clothing Steamer, there is a 304 stainless steel ball inside the pressure cap on the water tank. When the back pressure builds up to a point greater than the design pressure in the cap, the ball will be moved off the pressure relief hole and vent the boiler tank.

Jiffy Clothing Steamer

 

The combined gas law allows the calculation of the amount of pressure.

𝑷𝟏*𝑽𝟏/𝑻𝟏=𝑷𝟐*𝑽𝟐/𝑻𝟐

Where:

P – Pressure with units in pascals,

V – Volume with units in cubic meters (m3)

T – Temperature measured in Kelvin

If the volume does not change during the boiling process, the ambient pressure (101.3 kPa) will increase to 129 kPa when room temperature water is heated until it boils. The 28 kPa rise in pressure is 4 psi.

While the only variable that the user can control is the amount of heat applied to the water, with a MEMS pressure sensor, the safe design value can be verified and tested for manufacturing consistency in production.

Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
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Pressure for a Safe Installation

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Pressure for a Safe Installation

When an old heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) unit is past its prime, it’s time to bring in the experts.  Before the HVAC experts can apply their skills, the unit must be safely moved from the truck that brought it to its ultimate mounting location. This involves several safety protocols including solidly anchoring the truck and its crane, carefully attaching the cable to lift and move the unit, monitoring both the angle of the arm and amount of weight being lifted and, finally, avoiding sway. While several of these aspects, especially the last one, are ensured by the expertise of the operator, a pressure measurement from a load meter tells the operator that the load is withing the safe lifting capabilities of the crane including its hydraulics.

HVAC Unit Replacement Process

Safely lifting and moving the HVAC unit includes monitoring the weight of the load through a pressure measurement. In this case, the UNIC gauge provides the weight in 1000# and hydraulic pressure in psi with a red line at 3,000 psi.

Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
Email us at [email protected]