Pressure Washing

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Pressure Washing

If you had your house painted recently by a good painter, you probably saw, or at least heard, the gas pressure washer used to get the dirt and loose paint off during the prep phase. For do it yourselfers, power washers are either gas or electric powered. Gas-powered models typically have 2,000 to 3,000 psi of pressure compared with 1,000 to 1,800 psi for electric models. If the home owner is cleaning decks, siding or other large areas, the gas-powered unit is recommended. However, the higher pressure from the gas-powered unit comes with higher noise level of 85 decibels (dBA) versus around 78 dBA for an electric model. To address different applications, many units have different nozzles but, in some cases, units may also have an unloader valve for pressure adjustment. Similar to other products that do not have a pressure gauge or a pressure sensor in a control circuit, the manufacture still has to use pressure sensing in the design qualification and quality control aspects of the product.

NorthStar Cold Water Pressure Washer

Image courtesy of NorthStar
https://www.amazon.com/NorthStar-Cold-Water-Pressure-Washer/dp/B00BINVIHC

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Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
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Protecting MEMS Pressure Sensors with Parylene

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Protecting MEMS Pressure Sensors with Parylene

Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) pressure sensors provide accurate measurements for many applications. However, the top side of the piezoresistive MEMS pressure sensor die that has the sensing elements and potentially other circuitry cannot survive exposure to many common items that need to have their pressure measured — including water. To isolate the top surface of the pressure sensor die and other exposed circuitry, parylene is often used as a protective coating. Applied by a vapor deposition polymerization process, the parylene allows pressure to be transmitted to the top side of the pressure sensor to make measurements without damaging or impacting the reliability of the circuitry. The conformal, thin-film coating provides a moisture, chemical and dielectric barrier to protect the sensor’s critical circuitry in medical, automotive and other applications.

In fact, parylene extends the applications that a specific sensor design can address and is part of the packaging expertise that a sensor company may provide. Parylene coating can be found on a wide variety of All Sensors’ products. Specifically, parylene coating is available in all miniature digital product families such as the miniature digital DLVR, DLHR and DLLR Series as well as the millivolt output MLV series and the miniature digital and analog ELVR series.

All Sensors' E1BD Package

 

A protective parylene coating is an option for moisture/harsh media protection in the DLVR, DLHR and DLLR Series E1BD package.

Comments/Questions?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
Email us at info@allsensors.com

Pressure and Water Safety

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Pressure and Water Safety

“Not (intended as) a life saving device” is commonly found on inflatable products that can be used in a pool, river, lake and even the ocean.  With the summer of 2019 well under way, most inflatables have already been pressurized so they can float and support the weight of even the heaviest person. However, when a new float is purchased or one found that wasn’t inflated, the user has the choice of using a pump or their lungs to add the necessary quantity of air. If a pump is not an option, the amount of air that must be blown into the device can be an issue, especially for a large float or for a person with limited lung capacity. For a large float, it could take a lot of time for the cumulative exhales to inflate it.

While it gets obvious when the float is near its limits, pressure is also an issue. Buoyancy or buoyant force is created by the difference between the pressure at the bottom of the float pushing it up and the pressure at the top pushing down. Archimedes principle and actual pressure measurements for flow and internal pressure could be brought into this discussion but it’s time to just relax and float around.

Yellow Pool Float

 

Comments/Questions?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
Email us at info@allsensors.com

Pressure Sensors and the IoT

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Pressure Sensors and the IoT

The recently published “The Internet of Things (IoT) Sensors Market” report states, “In an Internet of Things ecosystem, two things are very important, the Internet and physical devices like sensors and actuators.” Based on the importance of the sensors, the report projects that the IoT sensors market will reach US$ 23.82 Billion by 2024, at a CAGR of 34.1% between 2018 and 2024.

The analysis includes pressure, temperature, humidity, magnetometer, gyroscope, accelerometer, image and inertial sensors. Segmented into wired and wireless pieces, the IoT sensor market report analyzes Consumer, Commercial, and Industrial market segments.

All Sensors' MEMS Pressure Sensors

Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) pressure sensors deliver the size, performance, power consumption and cost to satisfy many if not most of the IoT pressure sensing requirements. Based on the variety of measurements that they address, it should not surprise anyone that their data will be used in numerous monitoring and control applications – cloud based or otherwise.

Comments/Questions?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
Email us at info@allsensors.com