Pressure in HVAC Systems

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Pressure in HVAC Systems

While addressing COVID-19 health issues and getting back to normal, one of the major concerns, especially for education, is acceptable ventilation.

Unfortunately, due to COVID-19, one of the leading conferences in this area, the Michigan Industrial Ventilation Conference, will not be held this year. In its place, a series of webinars facilitated by conference instructors will cover the fundamentals of industrial ventilation.

As noted in the seminar description for the first of the these webinars that will start March 3, pressure, as  well as temperature, elevation, and moisture content impacts an airstream’s density and density factor.

Another webinar will specifically address difficult testing situations and detail selection methods for providing the most accurate representation of pressure and airflow possible. Yet another will cover techniques and equipment for monitoring industrial ventilation systems to ensure that the system operates properly.

Those interested in more information on alternatives being offered to the 2021 conference should click here.

All Sensors Corporation MAMP Series P1NS Package

Those who are interested in accurate pressure sensors in the low-pressure range to detect clogged filters and airflow in HVAC systems should consider All Sensors MAMP Series of calibrated amplified output that can address 5 to 120 cmH2O measurements.

Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
Email us at info@allsensors.com

Hydrology Pressures

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Hydrology Pressures

A previous Put the Pressure on Us blog post (Nileometer), showed how the ancient Egyptians measured the amount of annual flooding of the Nile to predict the future crop harvest. Today, a staff gage with a vertical scale indicates the elevation of water, or stage in wetlands relative to a reference elevation. The water level measurement is one key aspect of wetland hydrology to monitor the transition zone between pre-dominantly wet (lakes, rivers, etc.) and dry environments.

Example of a United States Geological Survey (USGS) style staff gage. Source: EPA

Example of a United States Geological Survey (USGS) style staff gage. Source: EPA.

However, “Best Practices for Continuous Monitoring of Temperature and Flow in Wadeable Streams,” published by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, provides information regarding the use of vented (gage) and non-vented (absolute) pressure transducers for Regional Monitoring Networks (RMNs). An accuracy of ≤ 0.015 feet, or 0.18 inches (.0065 psi), is recommended. In its guidance on how to collect accurate, year-round temperature and hydrologic data the report notes that “because atmospheric pressure changes with weather and altitude, compensating for barometric variations is necessary; failure to account for these variations could result in errors of 0.6 m (2 ft) or more.” An All Sensors SPA 401 or SPM 401 piezoresistive silicon pressure sensor with stainless steel interface and media isolation could be used in this type of application.

Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
Email us at info@allsensors.com

Pressure Vessels to Infinity and Beyond

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Pressure Vessels to Infinity and Beyond

Well, maybe not quite that far. As noted in an earlier Put the Pressure on Us blog, a pressure vessel is a storage tank or vessel that has been designed to operate at pressures above 15 psig. The Office of Safety and Mission Assurance Division of National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) reports that there are approximately 10,000 ground-based Pressure Vessels and Systems (PVS) across the agency.

However, there are out of this world applications, too. One example is the pressure vessel built for the crew compartment of the Orion spacecraft. In this pressure vessel, flight crews will live and operate the spacecraft on flights from the Earth to cislunar (within the Moon’s orbit) space and back. While the vacuum of space exists outside of the vessel, an earthlike 15 psia pressure must be monitored and controlled inside to support the crew.

In contrast, an unpressurized lunar rover is being pursued as part of NASA’s project to land the first woman and the next man on the Moon by 2024. In this case, the astronauts’ suit will regulate the pressure the aliens from earth will need to survive.

The crew module pressure vessel for NASA’s first crewed Orion spacecraft. Source: NASAspaceflight.com

The crew module pressure vessel for NASA’s first crewed Orion spacecraft. Source: NASAspaceflight.com

Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
Email us at info@allsensors.com

Pressure Vessels

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Pressure Vessels

Industrial pressure vessels, essential to the continual processing and manufacturing by industrial and commercial enterprises, have three common types: storage vessels, heat exchangers and process vessels. In general, a pressure vessel is a storage tank or vessel that has been designed to operate at pressures above 15 psig. The pressure can be either internal or external.

A vertical pressure container. Courtesy: Buckeye Fabricating

A vertical pressure container. Courtesy: Buckeye Fabricating.

According to the report “Pressure Vessel – Global Market Outlook (2019-2027),” the Global Pressure Vessel Market accounted for $40.85 billion in 2019 and is expected to reach $67.6 billion by 2027, growing at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 6.5% during the forecast period.

In addition to industrial and commercial applications, there are many government pressure vessels as well. For example, the Office of Safety and Mission Assurance Division of U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) reports that there are approximately 10,000 ground-based Pressure Vessels and Systems (PVS) across the agency.

The pressures contained by these vessels can vary considerably. As a result, the NASA standard “NASA Requirements for Ground-Based Pressure Vessels and Pressurized Systems (PVS)” (NASA-STD-8719.17, Revision: C, Dated 2017-08-09) specifically includes systems often referred to as “low pressure” such as building and facility services equipment (such as shop air), laboratory systems and vacuum systems. To cope with the wide range of pressures, the sensors and measuring systems to monitor and control these vessels can vary widely as well.

Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
Email us at info@allsensors.com