Compression Treatment Pressure

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Compression Treatment Pressure

A machine that provides dynamic air compression can help users recover faster from an injury or improve their training and maximize their performance. For example, Hyperice’s Normatec 3 uses dynamic air compression to create 7 compression levels. Patented pulse technology delivers treatment to 5 overlapping zones and uses biomimicry to replicate the natural muscle pumps of the legs. Alternatively, a different attachment performs similar action to the arms.

Hyperice Normatec 3 Dynamic Air Compression Treatment

A computer-controlled compressor with digitally controlled valve system channels air to each zone. Each zone is inflated like an automatic blood pressure with a pressure range from 30 to 110 mmHg. Patented pulsing action occurs for an allotted amount of time at the set intensity level. ZoneBoost™ technology allows the user to increase the intensity of a single zone on the attachment by adding an extra 60 seconds of massage time as well as 10 mmHg increased pressure in the selected zone.

The sequential massage pattern begins by compressing the user’s feet, hands, or upper quad depending on which attachment is used. Each zone of the attachment compresses and then holds pressure. This process repeats for each zone of the attachment as the compression pattern works toward the user’s heart.

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Pressure Sensors and Safe Drinking Water Systems

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Pressure Sensors and Safe Drinking Water Systems

Surprisingly, with all the water on planet Earth, less than 1% of all water is fresh and accessible. To ensure a fresh water supply, International Standard / American National Standard “NSF/ANSI 61 Drinking Water System Components – Health Effects” was initially adopted in June 1988 and has been revised and updated frequently with the most recent version revised December 2021. This Standard establishes minimum health effects requirements for the chemical contaminants and impurities that are indirectly imparted to drinking water from products, components, and materials used in drinking water systems.

The standard defines a point-of-entry (POE) system as a system with a minimum initial clean-system flow rate of no less than 15 L/min at 103 kilopascals pressure drop and 18 ± 5 °C water temperature (not less than 4 gal/min at 15 psig pressure drop and 65 ± 10 °F water temperature) used to treat the water supply at a building or facility for drinking, washing, and flushing or for other non-consumption water supply purposes. A pressure sensor from All Sensors’ media isolated SPA 402 family could measure and verify these pressure levels as part of a safe water supply.

All Sensors | SPA 402 Series

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Pressure in a Wind Tunnel

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Pressure in a Wind Tunnel

With their pioneering efforts in powered flight on December 17, 1903, the Wright Brothers had to take their airplane to Kitty Hawk, North Carolina to prove that it worked. The craft initially flew at an airspeed of 34 mph. However, before that day in December, they had performed air tunnel testing.  Their 1901 wind tunnel design provided an airflow of about 30 mph and balance instruments that they designed and built measured lift and drag to test their concepts on portions of the design.

Today, wind tunnels are essential to test any aircraft or modifications to an aircraft prior to an actual flight test. With classifications of low-speed or high-speed (as well as subsonic, transonic, supersonic, hypersonic and hypervelocity), air velocity in a closed-circuit design is controlled by changing the speed of the rotating fans or by adjusting the angle of the fan blades. Other measurements include pressure, temperature, and humidity of the air as well as force.

In 2018, wind tunnel testing was performed on a model Vimana aircraft design created from Indian Sanskrit writings over 1,800 years ago. A model pressure of -0.055” H2O was measured in a 56 mile per hour wind and force measurements indicated that the design was very stable.

Ancient Aliens: Vimana Model Aircraft Experiment (Season 12, Episode 11))Wind tunnel testing of an aircraft design from ancient Indian writings.
Source: YouTube (Ancient Aliens: Vimana Model Aircraft Experiment (Season 12, Episode 11))

Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
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Sensors Converge 2022

All Sensors is exhibiting at Sensors Converge 2022 with our parent company, Amphenol Sensor Technology Group.

Sensors Converge 2022

Please stop by Booth #424 at the McEnery Convention Center in San Jose from June 28 – 29, 2022 to say ‘hi’ and learn more about All Sensors!