Using Pressure Sensing to Reduce Blood Pressure

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Using Pressure Sensing to Reduce Blood Pressure

Blood pressure measurements can alert a person of the presence of hypertension or high blood pressure and monitor blood pressure on an ongoing basis. Besides daily medication, the usual recommendations to reduce blood pressure are: lose weight, abstain from smoking, follow a healthy diet and perform regular physical activity, such as walking or swimming. Among the newer actions that a person can take is performing a limited amount of focused isometric therapy using a handgrip device.

Research studies have shown that less than 1 hour per week of isometric exercise with a handgrip can lower the resting systolic blood pressure of hypertensive patients by about 10 mmHg. One manufacturer of an isometric tool suggests performing the exercise once a day for 5 days a week in 12-minute sessions. When a hand grip is squeezed, the device displays a score with a reading of 100 being the target but progress indicated by improvements toward that goal. Typically, a hand dynamometer indicates a grip force providing biofeedback by measuring pressure and converting the measurement to force based on the pressure applied to known area (P = F/A). A user’s true progress is confirmed by blood pressure measurements using any of the commonly available devices.

Zona Health Isometric Therapy Handgrip DeviceImage courtesy of Zona Health

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Pressure for Clean Windows

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Pressure for Clean Windows

Cleaning the glass windows at ground level for a multistory building is a little more complicated than the usual window cleaning task that most people hate. While much safer and less complex than rigs that clean high-rise buildings, as much as a 40-foot piping or pole system is required to reach windows in a four-story building from ground level but over 70-foot long poles are available. In most cases, the extended length consists of smaller sections pre-assembled at the building site for each operation but in some instances, a telescoping technique is used, at least for the last section.

With the water being pumped up several feet, a significant pressure drop can occur. For a 40-ft length pole, 17.3 psi is lost with 21.6 psi dropped at 50 feet and a 30.3 psi drop at 70 feet. As part of the water supply, water is pre-filtered. It then goes through a pressurized tank with a sand-like resin, so normal residential or commercial water pressure is increased.

Water-Fed Pole Cleaning System

While the poles in a water-fed pole cleaning system are made of lightweight carbon fiber, it still takes some strength and balance to do the job.

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Pressure for Dancing Waters

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Pressure for Dancing Waters

Dancing waters, waltzing waters or other terms for describing the combination of colors and the motion of water in a fountain with several spouts rely on changes in and controlling the pressure for a defined time at each point in a water grid.

The computer-controlled systems consist of water, holding tanks, pumps to create pressure, solenoid operated valves, lighting and quite a few cleaver design tricks. For one of world’s most famous fountains, the one at the Bellagio in Las Vegas, uses only white lights. The number of sprayers and the height more than make up for the lack of color, especially with the majestic hotel in the background.

The fountain has over 1,200 sprayers that include 16 super jets that launch water 460 feet in finales. Called shooters by Wet Design that constructed the system, four different types of shooters are identified:

      • Programmable oarsman make the water dance up to 77 feet
      • Minishooters reach 100 feet
      • Supershooters achieve 240 feet and
      • Extreme-shooters can propel water up to 460 feet

Design aspects of each type vary but the SuperShooter has a 12-ft high holding tank, 1 foot in diameter that contains about 765 gallons. When air stored at 200 psi in 60-gallon receivers is released into the tank, the water climbs up to 240 feet. In contrast, smaller shooters with smaller tanks only require a few psi of air pressure to send water 10 to 12 ft into the air.

A water display on board a cruise ship A water display at sea on a cruise ship provides an interesting variation to moving water.

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Diamond Rain

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Diamond Rain

Besides being planets in our solar system, what do Saturn, Jupiter, Neptune and Uranus have in common? One answer is an abundance of diamonds. In fact, raining diamonds is frequently attributed to these planets.

On our planet, carbon atoms bond together to form diamond crystals under pressures of 725,000 psi (5,000,000 KPa or 5 GPa) and at temperatures of 2000 to 2200°F (1366 to 1478 K), conditions found deep within the earth’s mantle. With high concentration of methane in their atmospheres, the diamond planets just need the right combination of pressure and temperatures. On earth, scientists have dynamically compressed polystyrene (a hydrocarbon plastic) with pressures around 150 GPa (2.176e7 psi) and temperatures around 5,000 K (8540°F) – conditions that resemble the environment around 10,000 km below the surfaces of Neptune and Uranus. They concluded that diamond precipitation may require pressures about ten times as high as previously indicated by static compression experiments – and provided even more proof that diamonds are forever.

The Hope Diamond (Smithsonian Magazine)The Hope Diamond is earth’s most famous diamond.
Source: Smithsonian Magazine.

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