Pressure and Water Safety

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Pressure and Water Safety

“Not (intended as) a life saving device” is commonly found on inflatable products that can be used in a pool, river, lake and even the ocean.  With the summer of 2019 well under way, most inflatables have already been pressurized so they can float and support the weight of even the heaviest person. However, when a new float is purchased or one found that wasn’t inflated, the user has the choice of using a pump or their lungs to add the necessary quantity of air. If a pump is not an option, the amount of air that must be blown into the device can be an issue, especially for a large float or for a person with limited lung capacity. For a large float, it could take a lot of time for the cumulative exhales to inflate it.

While it gets obvious when the float is near its limits, pressure is also an issue. Buoyancy or buoyant force is created by the difference between the pressure at the bottom of the float pushing it up and the pressure at the top pushing down. Archimedes principle and actual pressure measurements for flow and internal pressure could be brought into this discussion but it’s time to just relax and float around.

Yellow Pool Float

 

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Pressure Sensors and the IoT

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Pressure Sensors and the IoT

The recently published “The Internet of Things (IoT) Sensors Market” report states, “In an Internet of Things ecosystem, two things are very important, the Internet and physical devices like sensors and actuators.” Based on the importance of the sensors, the report projects that the IoT sensors market will reach US$ 23.82 Billion by 2024, at a CAGR of 34.1% between 2018 and 2024.

The analysis includes pressure, temperature, humidity, magnetometer, gyroscope, accelerometer, image and inertial sensors. Segmented into wired and wireless pieces, the IoT sensor market report analyzes Consumer, Commercial, and Industrial market segments.

All Sensors' MEMS Pressure Sensors

Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) pressure sensors deliver the size, performance, power consumption and cost to satisfy many if not most of the IoT pressure sensing requirements. Based on the variety of measurements that they address, it should not surprise anyone that their data will be used in numerous monitoring and control applications – cloud based or otherwise.

Comments/Questions?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
Email us at info@allsensors.com

Pressure and Air Sampling

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Pressure and Air Sampling

If water damage has occurred inside your home, especially to the drywall, a remediation company will probably suggest sampling the air to determine if hazardous mold has developed. The process can be rather straightforward and simply consists of pumping a specific volume of air near the area of concern into a container for laboratory analysis. For lower cost, the volumetric sample is obtained by timing a specific airflow for a fixed amount of time. Then the sample can be submitted to an offsite lab.

Air Sampling Equipment

In addition to mold spores, air sampling also can be performed for pollen, insect parts, skin cell fragments, fibers such as asbestos, fiberglass, cellulose, clothing fibers) and organic particulates including ceramic, fly ash, copy toner and more.

In a work or potentially hazardous environment, verifying compliance to regulations on a periodic or even continuous basis can dictate much more accurate and precise readings. In digitally controlled pumps, a built-in airflow indicator can allow adjustment of the airflow from a few (5) to several 1000 (typically 4000 to 5000)ml/min.

SKC's Pocket Pump

SKC’s Pocket Pump displays airflow and pressure and has both constant flow and constant pressure modes. In this case, the pressure is 28.94 inches of mercury (inHg).

For air sampling equipment, All Sensors TLAX Series 4 to 20 mA Output Transmitter can provide the necessary accuracy as well as improved overall long term stability. The sensors have operating pressure ranges of 0.5 to 30 inH2O differential and gauge and 1 to 150 PSI differential and gauge.

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Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
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Pressurized

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Pressurized

When subjected to sufficient pressure in a closed container, some gases become liquids at normal temperatures. Called liquified gases, common liquified gases include: anhydrous ammonia, chlorine, propane, nitrous oxide and carbon dioxide. Equilibrium inside the tank means that the contents exists in a liquid-vapor balance state. In contrast, some gases, called non-liquified gases, including oxygen, nitrogen, helium and argon, do not become liquid even at very high pressures. However, with lower temperatures as well as higher pressure, some gases, such as oxygen, can be converted to a liquid. The differences in these processes are used for scientific, industrial and commercial purposes. At or above its critical temperature, no amount of pressure will cause the gas to liquefy. The minimum pressure required to liquefy a gas at its critical temperature is called the critical pressure. When pressure is an essential part of the process, both the pressure and the temperature are controlled and monitored.

Carbon dioxide pressure-temperature phase diagram

Carbon dioxide pressure-temperature phase diagram. Source: Wikipedia.

Comments/Questions?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
Email us at info@allsensors.com