Tag Archives: water pressure

Water Pistol Pressure

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Water Pistol Pressure

Q. How do you elevate the basic water pistol experience?

A. By giving it more pressure.

Operating similar to the opposite of a hydraulic jack, a common water pistol employs Pascal’s Principle for a fluid at rest in a closed container: a pressure change in one part is transmitted without loss to every portion of the fluid and to the walls of the container. In equation form, it’s:

P1=F1/A1=P2=F2/A2

For the pressure to remain constant, if A1=n*A2, then F1=n*F2.

SuperSoaker water pressure

To take the water pistol to the next level, NASA engineer Lonnie Johnson conceived of the idea of a pressurized water gun with a pressure reservoir that became the Super Soaker. The ultimate Super Soaker used a constant pressure system (CPS) with a separate compression chamber that contained a thick-walled rubber balloon.

While the difference in the length and amount of the output (flow) of a standard water pistol vs. the Super Soaker vs. the CPS 2000 Mark1 Super Soaker is discussed in several blogs, the pressure in each is not. Those interested in pressure will just have to make their own measurements. All Sensors’ SPM 401 Series or CPM 602 Series pressure sensors with media isolation could provide those measurements.

Comments/Questions?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
Email us at info@allsensors.com

The Pressure to Automatically Make Ice

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

The Pressure to Automatically Make Ice

The ice dispenser on a refrigerator is a great feature and, in most cases, taken for granted – until it doesn’t make ice. One of the reasons for an icemaker failure is insufficient water pressure. To work properly, most refrigerators require a minimum of 20 to 40 psi for the icemaker. This ensures that the water inlet valve functions properly. For a particular make and model of refrigerator, the exact water pressure requirement is specified in the installation manual. To verify the pressure value to use in the manual, the manufacturer would make several measurements to determine the minimum pressure.

Since refrigerators (and most home owners) do not have a pressure gage, how can insufficient water pressure be ruled out as a cause of an icemaker failure? One manufacturer recommends dispensing water into a large measuring cup for 20 seconds and if the amount of water is more than 13.5 ounces (400 cubic centimeters), the water pressure is OK. If a person really wanted to know the exact amount, they could use one of All Sensors’ SPM 401 Series or CPM 602 Series pressure sensors with media isolation to prevent interface problems.

Kenmore Accela Ice Caddie

Comments/Questions?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
Email us at info@allsensors.com

Sensing Pressure in Washing Machines

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities and you. In this blog we’ll be discussing the pressure in washing machines.

Sensing Pressure in Washing Machines

Initially, timing was used to estimate the amount of water for various washing machine cleaning cycles. Today, many manufacturers sense the pressure developed in an air dome that is referenced to the water level and provides a much more accurate measurement. The air pressure level is measured either by a pressure switch or a pressure sensor with air providing isolation from the long term effects of operating a diaphragm in direct contact with water and other contamination.

The pressure switch can close and/or open contacts to provide an input to other circuitry. In contrast, the pressure sensor can provide either an analog or digital output to the washing machine control unit. Since the pressure sensor’s output directly results in a power control function such activating a pump or motor, in some manufacturers products, the pressure sensor is mounted in a Power Control and Pressure Sensing Module. The water level in most washing machines is well below 2 feet (0.87 psi), so a pressure sensor that can measure 1 psi would work in this application.

2016-10-12_21-28-14

Air pressure is sensed to measure water level in washing machines. Source: http://removeandreplace.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/washer-overfill.jpg

 What do you think/Comments?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let me know and I’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
– Han Mai, Senior Marketing Specialist, All Sensors Corporation (hmai@allsensors.com)

Pressure in the Panama Canal and Other Locations

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities and you. In this blog we’ll be discussing pressure sensors used in canals.

Pressure in the Panama Canal and Other Locations

Depending on the direction, the lock system at the Panama Canal lifts or lowers a ship 85 feet to make the transition from the Pacific to the Atlantic Ocean. The pressure can be calculated from Pascal’s Law-

P= ρgh

Where,

P = pressure (Pa = N/m2)

ρ = density of fluid (Water = 1000 kg/m3)

g = gravity (9.81 m/s2)

h = depth (m)

While the Panama Canal is among the most famous canals in the world, several lock systems exist in the continental U.S. including on the Mississippi River, Saint Lawrence Seaway, the Soo Locks at Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan and others. In addition, dams also control the flow of water along many rivers.

At the Panama Canal, 265 meteorological and 52 hydrometric stations were installed  to measure meteorological parameters of pressure, temperature, extreme temperature, humidity, precipitation (quantity and intensity), wind (speed and direction), evaporation, soil temperature, insolation and solar radiation. With the pressure measurements, the hydrometric stations monitor the rivers and lakes levels continuously. Modern pressure sensors allow even more measurements to be made and communicated to remote monitoring locations for a variety of purposes.

post42

The dam on Miraflores Lake at the Panama Canal.

What do you think/Comments?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let me know and I’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
-Han Mai, Senior Marketing Specialist, All Sensors Corporation (hmai@allsensors.com)