Tag Archives: PSI

Low Pressure for Consistency and Safety

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Low Pressure for Consistency and Safety

A liquid propane (LP) powered portable heater can make an enclosed space tolerable and even comfortable when the outdoor temperatures are low. Many systems use pressures in the range of 10 to 20 psi. However, these pressures can reduce the unit’s BTU output as the temperature drops. In contrast, a low-pressure portable heater system such as Dyna-Glo’s Delux 60,000-BTU Portable Forced Air Propane Heater can consistently achieve maximum BTU outputs, even in extremely cold environments. Operating at only 0.5 psi, the unit is also safer. Since the operating pressure is determined by design and not measured during operation, it does not have a pressure sensor. However, in the design verification or quality control processes, a pressure sensor such as All Sensors SPM 401 Series media isolated sensor could be used by manufacturers that make low pressure heaters as well as those that make high pressure heaters.

Dyna-Glo's Delux 60,000-BTU Portable Forced Air Propane Heater

Image courtesy of GHP Group, Inc.

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Fire Extinguisher Pressure

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Fire Extinguisher Pressure

Caution: Contents under pressure. The typical residential or consumer fire extinguisher comes with this warning and a pressure gauge to ensure that it is in a safe zone and prepared for use should the occasion arise.

An extinguisher designed for use with a dry chemical only (ABC powder) like the one on the left in the figure is pressurized to 195 psi (1,344 kPa). Its gauge is in the green zone indicating that it is ready use. The clockwise red zone indicates an overcharged situation that could measure as much as 400 psi (2,758 kPa). A counterclockwise measurement below the safe zone, like the one on the right, means the extinguisher has lost charge and needs to be recharged to be effective. With only three pressure readings available (0, 195 and 400 psi), significant interpolation is required to determine the pressure if the reading is outside of the set range. Since the operating pressure is 195 psi and the pressure could go as high as 400 psi, tanks are pressure tested at an even higher level such as 585 psi (4,033 kPa) to ensure that they are safe. For this testing and other measurments in the manufacturing process, an accurate electronic measurement with high resolution, like the All Sensors CPM 602 Series, could provide the answer.

Fire Extinguisher

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Pressure – Can You Dig It?

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Pressure – Can You Dig It?

You certainly can dig a trench with pressure. Even a rather small pedestrian (walk behind) trencher with a 48” or smaller boom uses 2,900 psi of hydraulic pressure. With a 48” boom, a compact trencher has track ground pressure of around 4.6 psi. While the high pressure is developed in a hydraulic drive using a pump and motor to transmit power, the much smaller ground pressure indicates how well the weight of the machine is distributed.

Ground pressure is very important in areas that require a light footprint from equipment, such as public parks, ball fields, cemeteries, public beaches and, in fact, any finished landscape. The choice of tires or a track system makes significant difference in ground pressure. A track model can exert from 2 to 4 psi of ground pressure and a model with tires will exert about 7 to 12 psi of ground pressure. While the tires value may seem like it is way too high, for comparison, an adult standing on the lawn would exert about 6 to 8 psi of ground pressure. So, in most instances, a person digging the trench by hand actually generates more ground pressure. This is just another example of how knowing the actual pressure value is important to make the right decision.

Ground Pressure by the Numbers

A heavy-duty construction rubber track crawler carrier has a lower ground pressure than the average human being. Source: Teremac News, 12/6/2013.

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Pressure Makes Great Sparkling Wines

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Pressure Makes Great Sparkling Wines

Interested in a little taste of the bubbly? Well, why not? The effervescence adds a substantial taste difference to wine that many people enjoy. Opening a bottle may be a little tricky based on the pressure inside of it. Depending on the wine and the manufacturer, the pressure typically can range from 70 to 90 psi. That’s about five to over six times atmospheric pressure. No wonder the cork can fly across the room if the proper precautions are not taken.

Champagne Under Pressure

Source: https://www.finedininglovers.com/stories/champagne-bottle-secrets/

In Champagne and other sparkling wines, the pressure is created by carbon dioxide, which forms naturally as yeast interacts with grape sugars. Different fermenting, bottling methods and the type of grapes as well as aging are key factors in the actual pressure inside the bottle.

For example, the pressure in a Champagne bottle from France is about 6 bar (90 psi) and, in contrast, a bottle of Prosecco, from northeast Italy, has a pressure of about 3.5 bar (51 psi). Since it has to withstand more pressure, Champagne actually uses a heavier bottle, something a winery would want to know to avoid problems. While putting a pressure sensor on each bottle of wine is impractical, testing each manufactured bottle or at least verifying the manufacturing processes’ capability to consistently provide bottles that can withstand a maximum pressure is just a good manufacturing practice. For these applications, the accuracy and cost effectiveness of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) pressure sensors that can measure 100 psi certainly makes sense.

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