Tag Archives: PSI

Pressure – Can You Dig It?

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Pressure – Can You Dig It?

You certainly can dig a trench with pressure. Even a rather small pedestrian (walk behind) trencher with a 48” or smaller boom uses 2,900 psi of hydraulic pressure. With a 48” boom, a compact trencher has track ground pressure of around 4.6 psi. While the high pressure is developed in a hydraulic drive using a pump and motor to transmit power, the much smaller ground pressure indicates how well the weight of the machine is distributed.

Ground pressure is very important in areas that require a light footprint from equipment, such as public parks, ball fields, cemeteries, public beaches and, in fact, any finished landscape. The choice of tires or a track system makes significant difference in ground pressure. A track model can exert from 2 to 4 psi of ground pressure and a model with tires will exert about 7 to 12 psi of ground pressure. While the tires value may seem like it is way too high, for comparison, an adult standing on the lawn would exert about 6 to 8 psi of ground pressure. So, in most instances, a person digging the trench by hand actually generates more ground pressure. This is just another example of how knowing the actual pressure value is important to make the right decision.

Ground Pressure by the Numbers

A heavy-duty construction rubber track crawler carrier has a lower ground pressure than the average human being. Source: Teremac News, 12/6/2013.

Comments/Questions?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
Email us at info@allsensors.com

Pressure Makes Great Sparkling Wines

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Pressure Makes Great Sparkling Wines

Interested in a little taste of the bubbly? Well, why not? The effervescence adds a substantial taste difference to wine that many people enjoy. Opening a bottle may be a little tricky based on the pressure inside of it. Depending on the wine and the manufacturer, the pressure typically can range from 70 to 90 psi. That’s about five to over six times atmospheric pressure. No wonder the cork can fly across the room if the proper precautions are not taken.

Champagne Under Pressure

Source: https://www.finedininglovers.com/stories/champagne-bottle-secrets/

In Champagne and other sparkling wines, the pressure is created by carbon dioxide, which forms naturally as yeast interacts with grape sugars. Different fermenting, bottling methods and the type of grapes as well as aging are key factors in the actual pressure inside the bottle.

For example, the pressure in a Champagne bottle from France is about 6 bar (90 psi) and, in contrast, a bottle of Prosecco, from northeast Italy, has a pressure of about 3.5 bar (51 psi). Since it has to withstand more pressure, Champagne actually uses a heavier bottle, something a winery would want to know to avoid problems. While putting a pressure sensor on each bottle of wine is impractical, testing each manufactured bottle or at least verifying the manufacturing processes’ capability to consistently provide bottles that can withstand a maximum pressure is just a good manufacturing practice. For these applications, the accuracy and cost effectiveness of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) pressure sensors that can measure 100 psi certainly makes sense.

Comments/Questions?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
Email us at info@allsensors.com

 

Jumping for Joy Over Pressure

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities and you. In this blog we’ll discuss air pressure and safety in bounce houses.

Jumping for Joy Over Pressure

When the weather is nice and a special event warrants a bounce house, kids get a first-hand experience of the importance of pressure. The air-filled chambers allow bouncing, falling and a lot of fun. Maintaining the pressure requires a pump to run continuously and usually the required pressure is not measured or displayed because it has been predetermined in pre-production design and testing. Unlike a thick rubber tire, the relatively thin vinyl material of the bounce house only requires a few psi to elevate it above the hard ground. With names like Cloud 9 and Jump for Joy as suppliers, it is easy to see how the inflated structure takes children away from the normal day-to-day realities. However, safety is still an issue.

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When safety in a bounce house is discussed, it usually involves parts per million (ppm) of potentially toxic materials  including lead or human contamination. According to one source’s analysis of a specific product, “Lead levels in the vinyl, the tests found, varied from 5,000 parts per million to 29,000, far above the federal limit of 90 to 300 parts per million.” Fortunately, pressure problems are not a concern, since under or over inflation are easily observed by both visual and audible (the pump’s noise) human sensing.

What do you think/Comments?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let me know and I’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
-Han Mai, Senior Marketing Specialist, All Sensors Corporation (hmai@allsensors.com)