Tag Archives: pressure

Pressure Makes Great Sparkling Wines

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Pressure Makes Great Sparkling Wines

Interested in a little taste of the bubbly? Well, why not? The effervescence adds a substantial taste difference to wine that many people enjoy. Opening a bottle may be a little tricky based on the pressure inside of it. Depending on the wine and the manufacturer, the pressure typically can range from 70 to 90 psi. That’s about five to over six times atmospheric pressure. No wonder the cork can fly across the room if the proper precautions are not taken.

Champagne Under Pressure

Source: https://www.finedininglovers.com/stories/champagne-bottle-secrets/

In Champagne and other sparkling wines, the pressure is created by carbon dioxide, which forms naturally as yeast interacts with grape sugars. Different fermenting, bottling methods and the type of grapes as well as aging are key factors in the actual pressure inside the bottle.

For example, the pressure in a Champagne bottle from France is about 6 bar (90 psi) and, in contrast, a bottle of Prosecco, from northeast Italy, has a pressure of about 3.5 bar (51 psi). Since it has to withstand more pressure, Champagne actually uses a heavier bottle, something a winery would want to know to avoid problems. While putting a pressure sensor on each bottle of wine is impractical, testing each manufactured bottle or at least verifying the manufacturing processes’ capability to consistently provide bottles that can withstand a maximum pressure is just a good manufacturing practice. For these applications, the accuracy and cost effectiveness of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) pressure sensors that can measure 100 psi certainly makes sense.

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Negative Pressure Wound Therapy

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Negative Pressure Wound Therapy

Unlike Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT) that employs a chamber with a pressure higher than 1 atmosphere absolute, negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) uses a vacuum to enhance and promote wound healing in acute, chronic and burn wounds. In this medical procedure, a sealed wound dressing is attached to a pump that creates a negative pressure environment for the wound.

The vacuum helps to increase blood flow to the area and draw out excess fluid from the wound and depending on the type of wound type or location, it can either be applied continuously or intermittently. This type of therapy can be implemented for a few days to several months at a time.

The types of wounds that can benefit from negative pressure wound therapy, include:

  • diabetic ulcers
  • venous ulcers
  • arterial ulcers
  • pressure ulcers
  • first and second-degree burns
  • chronic wounds
  • wounds with large amounts of drainage
  • surgical and acute wounds at high risk for infection

Acelity V.A.C.Ulta Therapy System

Used in its V.A.C.ULTA™ Therapy System and other wound care products, Acelity’s SENSAT.R.A.C.™ Technology is a real-time pressure feedback system that adjusts its pump’s output, compensating for wound distance, wound position, exudate characteristics and patient movement. Source: Acelity.

The applied negative pressure in NPWT can range from -125 to -75 mmHg (-2.4 to -1.5 psi) depending on the type of wound and the patient’s tolerance. For this application, All Sensor’s DLV-005D with its digital output would be an easy way to measure the vacuum level for both the machine’s use and the health care provider’s and patient’s observation.

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Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
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Cooking with Pressure

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Cooking with Pressure

When time is of the essence, add pressure to your cooking. This can allow you to prepare foods up to 70% percent faster than conventional cooking methods and it is applicable to cooking a wide range of foods. An electric pressure cooker (EPC) greatly simplifies the process. After selecting the high or low pressure setting on the control panel, you just press the high or low button for increasing or decreasing the cooking time and then press Start. While simple, an electric unit can take almost three times longer to reach pressure than a stovetop model.

A North America pressure cooker operates at a nominal pressure of 15 psi (103 kPa) (high pressure) or less (typically 6-8 psi for the low pressure setting).

The positive feedback system in one company’s EPC allows it to achieve precise cooking conditions. In addition to pressure sensing and other elements, a microprocessor controls the timing, heating and complex cooking cycles. The pressure sensor indicates lower than working pressure or when the working pressure is reached.

InstantPot - Electric Pressure Cooker

Instant Pot’s electric pressure cooker contains a heating element, pressure and temperature sensors and a control box. Source: Instant Pot.

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Large Pressure Drop Indicates a Bomb Cyclone

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Large Pressure Drop Indicates a Bomb Cyclone

One of the first weather oddities to hit the United States in 2018 was the bomb cyclone, or bombogenesis, as meteorologists call it. This type of winter storm with unusually low temperatures is indicated by a low pressure drop of at least 24 millibars (0.35 psi) in 24 hours. With normal pressures around 1000 millibars (14.7 psia) near sea level, this represents a 2.3% change from the normal reading.

In this year’s bomb cyclone, the pressure dropped by 54 millibars in 24 hours, more than twice the standard criteria, indicating a very strong storm. In fact, it was considered one of the greatest rapidly deepening rates ever observed by the National Weather Service.

With the continuous resolution capabilities of microelectromechanical (MEMS) pressure sensors, even the change of a few millibars can be easily observed with an absolute pressure sensor.

NOAA GOES-16 Weather Satellite

The 2018 bomb cyclone as observed from the GOES-16 weather satellite, which is operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

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Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
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