Tag Archives: pressure

Power Washing or Pressure Washing?

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Power Washing or Pressure Washing?

Washing your car or hosing off the driveway typically uses about 40 to 50 PSI of pressure. In contrast, the pressure in a power washer or a pressure washer can be 40 to 200 times higher. While these terms are sometimes used interchangeably, a power washer uses a high pressurized stream of hot water and pressure washer almost always uses high pressure cold or normal water. The operating pressure of the pressure washer varies considerably depending on the level of the machine.

Commercial grade pressure washers, can be from 1000 to 4000 PSI with pressures below 2000 PSI more common in more affordable units. For example, one electric pressure washer operates at 1600 PSI (max) and delivers 1.2 GPM (max). Another example, operates at maximum volume of 1.6 GPM and a maximum pressure of 2000 PSI.

Semi-pro pressure washers have a significantly higher power output, PSI and GPM ratings than commercial washers with 1800 to 3000 PSI and 1.6 to 4 GPM being typical ranges. These units typically use only cold water. Unlike an electric unit that operates at 1800 to 2000 PSI max, a gas type unit can deliver 2500 to 4000 PSI.

At the high end, professional pressure washers are rated at 3000 to 8000 PSI and 2 to 8 GPM and deliver cold and hot water. Pressure regulation is common in these units that allows decreasing the pressure for mixing with detergent, increasing the pressure for removing mold from brick or decreasing the pressure to sanitize commercial kitchens with hot water. Common applications of profession pressure washers include car washes, kitchens, meat packing facilities and more.

All Sensors CPA 602 Series media isolated ceramic amplified pressure sensors can address pressure measurements in pressure and power washing systems up to 6000 PSI.

Vortexx Pressure Washer

 

This professional pressure washer operates at 4000 PSI and 4 GPM max.
Source: Vortexx.

Comments/Questions?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
Email us at info@allsensors.com

The Pressure in Bubbles

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities and you. In this blog we’ll be discussing the pressure in bubbles.

The Pressure in Bubbles

The surface tension of the interface between liquid and gas creates a pressure difference. For a soap bubble, the pressurized bubble of air is contained within a thin, elastic surface of liquid. When the bubble bursts, the difference in pressure causes an audible pop.

The pressure difference can be calculated by using a simplified version of the Laplace pressure equation since the inner radius is essential the same as the outer radius. In this case,

Pi-Po = ΔP = 2*(2γ/R)

Where:

ΔP is the pressure difference in N/m2 or Pascals (Pa)

γ is the surface tension in N/m

R is the radius of the bubble in meters, and

2γ/R is the Laplace pressure.

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The ΔP is 2 times the Laplace pressure since there is a complete sphere instead of a semi sphere on a layer of water.

Based on the diameter, the pressure inside an air bubble in pure water, where γ = 72 mN/m at 25°C (298 K), can vary greatly.

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What do you think/Comments?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let me know and I’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
-Han Mai, Senior Marketing Specialist, All Sensors Corporation (hmai@allsensors.com)

The High Pressure Ridge

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities and you. In this blog we’ll be discussing pressure during dry weather.

The High Pressure Ridge

In “The Rise of the Ridiculously Resilient Ridge,” the author points out that persistent high pressure in recent years led to extreme drought in California. In fact, the terminology, “Ridiculously Resilient Ridge” of atmospheric high pressure is frequently used to describe ‘the unusually persistent atmospheric anomaly responsible for redirecting winter storms over the Pacific and ultimately bringing record-breaking warmth and dryness to the Golden State.” But what amount of high pressure is occurring?

As shown in the figure below, a pressure of 45 mb above the middle atmospheric pressure (500mb geopotential height (GPH)) is attributed to be the cause of unusually persistent weather patterns. This level deflects storms that would bring rain and snow to ease drought conditions. With 1 bar = 1000 mb at sea level, 500  mb is near 5,500 meters (18,000 ft).

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The middle atmospheric pressure (500 mb geopotential height) anomaly (meters) for the Ridiculously Resilient Ridge, Oct-May 2012-2015. Source: The Rise of the Ridiculously Resilient Ridge

In contrast to the ridge that tends to bring warmer and drier weather, a trough is a lower pressure region that tends to bring in cooler and cloudier weather as it approaches. Both are analyzed on pressure surfaces aloft such as 850, 700, 500 and 300 mb.

In July 2016, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, a “heat dome” occurred over large portions of the United States. The websites states that “a heat dome occurs when high pressure in the upper atmosphere acts as a lid, preventing hot air from escaping.” This atmospheric occurrence forces air to sink back to the surface, warming the air even further on its way down.

The heat dome that resulted from the high pressure prompted the National Weather Service to issue heat alerts for more than a dozen states across the U.S.

What do you think/Comments?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let me know and I’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
-Han Mai, Senior Marketing Specialist, All Sensors Corporation (hmai@allsensors.com)

Positive Pressure Personnel Suit

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities and you. In this blog we’ll be discussing pressure in protective suits.

Reports of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) biolab failures often provide a dramatic picture of a person in a HAZMAT (positive pressure) suit to demonstrate the hazardous environment.  In fact, ventilated and reusable pressurized protective suits are available for use in Bio Safety Level 4 (BSL-4, deathly viruses) laboratories worldwide.

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Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Positive_pressure_personnel_suit

According to the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID), there are four levels of biological containment, with BSL-4 being the highest level. In this environment, personnel must wear positive-pressure suits commonly called “space suits” and breathe filtered air. The air-tight suits are designed for positive pressure to prevent contamination to the wearer even if the suit becomes damaged.

One company offers a ventilated protective suit for BSL4-1 environments that can withstand a 5.4 bar (78.3 psi) pressure and has a valve for continuous adjustment.

Typical use for a BSL 4-1 biohazard suit could occur in industries such as:

  • Chemical
  • Oil and Gas
  • Pharmaceutical

To detect leaks, especially when the suit is used infrequently, periodic pressurized testing must be performed to maintain the integrity if the suit.

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Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Positive_pressure_personnel_suit

What do you think/Comments?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let me know and I’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
-Han Mai, Senior Marketing Specialist, All Sensors Corporation (hmai@allsensors.com)