Tag Archives: pressure sensors

Water Pistol Pressure

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Water Pistol Pressure

Q. How do you elevate the basic water pistol experience?

A. By giving it more pressure.

Operating similar to the opposite of a hydraulic jack, a common water pistol employs Pascal’s Principle for a fluid at rest in a closed container: a pressure change in one part is transmitted without loss to every portion of the fluid and to the walls of the container. In equation form, it’s:

P1=F1/A1=P2=F2/A2

For the pressure to remain constant, if A1=n*A2, then F1=n*F2.

SuperSoaker water pressure

To take the water pistol to the next level, NASA engineer Lonnie Johnson conceived of the idea of a pressurized water gun with a pressure reservoir that became the Super Soaker. The ultimate Super Soaker used a constant pressure system (CPS) with a separate compression chamber that contained a thick-walled rubber balloon.

While the difference in the length and amount of the output (flow) of a standard water pistol vs. the Super Soaker vs. the CPS 2000 Mark1 Super Soaker is discussed in several blogs, the pressure in each is not. Those interested in pressure will just have to make their own measurements. All Sensors’ SPM 401 Series or CPM 602 Series pressure sensors with media isolation could provide those measurements.

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Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
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The Pressure for Sterile Medical Equipment

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

The Pressure for Sterile Medical Equipment

Pressure and temperature are well-known medical measurements to indicate a patient’s health or detect an ailment. However, many people are unaware that these same two parameters, in a controlled environment, are essential to any medical or dental procedure that involves reusable instruments. To disinfect and sterilize surgical instruments and hospital equipment, objects are processed through an autoclave that uses high pressure and steam. The temperature, pressure and amount of time required to destroy bacteria, viruses and fungi vary depending on the item being sterilized. For the pressure value, this can be 15 psi above atmospheric pressure, 30 psi or 20 -40 psi for a chemical vapor process. According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), “Pressure serves as a means to obtain the high temperatures necessary to quickly kill microorganisms.”

Temperature and Pressure Gauges

The gauges on the right-hand side of this autoclave indicate temperature and pressure. Photo by PHAA Sarna courtesy of US Navy.

When monitoring and validation data are required, pressure transmitters are used in autoclaves. However, in cases where an autoclave is not available, for example, for rural and home sterilization, a domestic pressure cooker can even be used for sterilizing objects such as needles, syringes, and nursing bottles.

Comments/Questions?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
Email us at info@allsensors.com

The Pressures of a Modern Lifestyle

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

The Pressures of a Modern Lifestyle

After a restful night’s sleep, possibly in a water (<<28 mmHg) bed or on an air (<1 psi) mattress, the day begins with the flushing of a toilet, washing of hands and a relaxing shower. All these daily routines need adequate water pressure (40 to 45 psi). More water pressure is needed to get the filtered water (20-40 psi) for coffee. In many cases, the coffee is made by a pressurized (130.5 ± 14.5 psi) coffee/expresso machine. Before leaving home, a pressurized (10-100 psi) water-powered toothbrush could be used to clean the teeth.

The trip to work or wherever in a personal vehicle would almost always require riding on pressurized rubber tires whether it is a car, truck, motorcycle or even a bicycle (< 135 psi). If the vehicle is a car with an internal combustion engine, cylinder pressure provides the power to propel it and, in some cases, a turbocharger provides even more input air pressure. Hydraulic pressure provides the braking (800-2000 psi) and steering (80-125 psi).

Back at home after whatever the day has meant, it is cool thanks to the air conditioning compressor (<100 to >345 psi) and air delivery by the fan (1-in water column) through a clean air filter (<250 Pa). To relax, a pressurized bottle of liquid, perhaps a soda (30-50 psi), beer (<45 psi) or even sparkling wine (70-90 psi) is in order. With the stress of the day behind, your blood pressure (120/80 mmHg) and breathing (respiratory pressure) are probably the lowest they have been all day. Of course, the entire day occurred in atmospheric pressure whether it was near the ocean (14.7 psi) or in a mountain cabin at 1 mile above sea level (6.9 psi).

As another round of flushing, washing and brushing ends the day, the typical person is unaware of the value pressure has meant to their day to increase comfort, convenience and safety as well as save time and provide essential well-being. If they wanted to measure, monitor or control any of these or many other pressures, All Sensors has the pressure sensors to do the job.

Comments/Questions?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
Email us at info@allsensors.com

Suction Solutions

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities and you.

Suction Solutions

Designers often look to nature for ideas that can be implemented in new products. Octopus suction cups provide an interesting pressure example.

When the octopus’ sucker is sealed to a surface, contraction of its radial muscles thins the wall of the sucker which tends to increase the enclosed volume.  However, the cohesiveness of water resists volume expansion and the pressure of the enclosed water decreases instead. With this mechanism, an octopus can create a pressure differential of 100-200 kPa (14.5-29 psi) at sea level and generate a significant amount of force.

Suction cups allow professional glazers to easily pick up and move large pieces of glass. One company offers a Vacuum Cup Octopus with Pump that can lift a maximum weight of 185 kg (407.9 lbs.) vertically with a 300-mm (11.8-in) diameter vacuum cup. One version includes a manual vacuum pump with a leak gauge to monitor the effectiveness of the suction.

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Source: Vacuum Cup Octopus with Pump

Vacuum suction cups offer a versatile method of material handling. In fact, suction cups also allow robots to pick different smooth surfaced objects. The approach has been applied to the robotics field since the 1960s. One recent research effort focuses on suction cups that can be used on robots designed to perform tasks in unstructured and contaminated environments. Of course, monitoring the amount of vacuum (negative pressure) with an accurate and rugged microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) pressure sensor can provide an even greater amount of control to more sophisticated suction applications.

Comments/Questions?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
Email us at info@allsensors.com