Pressure and Gas Chromatography

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Pressure and Gas Chromatography

Gas chromatography uses stationary and mobile phases for separating and analyzing mixtures according to “Chromatography Composition Measurement,” in The Measurement, Instrumentation, and Sensors Handbook. To perform the necessary steps, the typical gas chromatograph has several different aspects. It starts with a pressure regulated carrier gas supply. The carrier gas pressures are typically 34 to 69 kPa (5 to 10 psig) to 138 to 340 kPa (20 to 50 psig) at gas flow rates of 1 mL min-1 or less. If the data system monitors and records the supplied pressures, pressure sensors would also be used.

To measure this range of pressures, All Sensors SPM 401 Series of media isolated sensors would provide a good solution since process control and monitoring systems are target applications.

Gas Chromatograph

The components of a gas chromatograph include regulating gas pressure.  Source: http://faculty.uml.edu/david_ryan/84.314/Instrumental%20Lecture%2016.pdf

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Piezoresistive MEMS Pressure Sensors Growth

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Piezoresistive MEMS Pressure Sensors Growth

A new report is available for pressure sensors from MarketResearch titled, “Pressure Sensor Market by Technology Advancement, Growth and Forecasts 2027.”

Over the forecast period, increasing technological advancements in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology as well as the rising adoption of this technology in connected devices are key factors driving growth. Of the analyzed technologies of piezoresistive, electromagnetic, capacitive, resonant solid state, and optical, piezoresistive technology is expected to enjoy the highest share in the market during this timeframe. Factors inhibiting growth include technical problems in integration and packaging processes and lack of a standard fabrication process.

While the market is segmented into automotive, oil & gas, consumer electronics, medical, industrial sector, and others, consumer electronics are expected to register significant share of revenue growth over the forecast period.

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Fire Extinguisher Pressure

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Fire Extinguisher Pressure

Caution: Contents under pressure. The typical residential or consumer fire extinguisher comes with this warning and a pressure gauge to ensure that it is in a safe zone and prepared for use should the occasion arise.

An extinguisher designed for use with a dry chemical only (ABC powder) like the one on the left in the figure is pressurized to 195 psi (1,344 kPa). Its gauge is in the green zone indicating that it is ready use. The clockwise red zone indicates an overcharged situation that could measure as much as 400 psi (2,758 kPa). A counterclockwise measurement below the safe zone, like the one on the right, means the extinguisher has lost charge and needs to be recharged to be effective. With only three pressure readings available (0, 195 and 400 psi), significant interpolation is required to determine the pressure if the reading is outside of the set range. Since the operating pressure is 195 psi and the pressure could go as high as 400 psi, tanks are pressure tested at an even higher level such as 585 psi (4,033 kPa) to ensure that they are safe. For this testing and other measurments in the manufacturing process, an accurate electronic measurement with high resolution, like the All Sensors CPM 602 Series, could provide the answer.

Fire Extinguisher

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Vacuum-Sealed Culinary Preservation and Preparation

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Vacuum-Sealed Culinary Preservation and Preparation

Vacuum sealing protects and preserves food and other perishable products. Both edge-style and chamber-style vacuum sealers are used for this process.  With chamber-style vacuum sealers, the negative pressures in the chamber and inside the bag are nearly always the same. These vacuum sealers also enable special culinary techniques including vacuum-compression or vacuum-infusion.

The vacuum sealing process simply consists of placing the food inside the chamber and closing the lid. Reducing the pressure to 5–50 mbar and then sealing the bag produces a tightly sealed package for most solid foods. A vacuum level of 50 millibars removes about 95% of the atmosphere and at 5 millibars about 99.5% of the air inside the chamber and packing is gone.

A unit like the VacMaster PRO350 Professional Vacuum Sealer has a control panel with pre-set vacuum settings and a digital display of the vacuum level for easy operation. In contrast, the VacMaster VP320 Counter Top Commercial Chamber Vacuum Sealer has a gauge to provide visual feedback to the operator.

VacMaster PRO350 Professional Vacuum SealerVacMaster VP320 Counter Top Commercial Chamber Vacuum Sealer

Note the digital display (a)  and mechanical gauge (b) on these chamber-style vacuum sealers. Source: VacMaster.

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