Tag Archives: pressure sensors

Suction Solutions

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities and you.

Suction Solutions

Designers often look to nature for ideas that can be implemented in new products. Octopus suction cups provide an interesting pressure example.

When the octopus’ sucker is sealed to a surface, contraction of its radial muscles thins the wall of the sucker which tends to increase the enclosed volume.  However, the cohesiveness of water resists volume expansion and the pressure of the enclosed water decreases instead. With this mechanism, an octopus can create a pressure differential of 100-200 kPa (14.5-29 psi) at sea level and generate a significant amount of force.

Suction cups allow professional glazers to easily pick up and move large pieces of glass. One company offers a Vacuum Cup Octopus with Pump that can lift a maximum weight of 185 kg (407.9 lbs.) vertically with a 300-mm (11.8-in) diameter vacuum cup. One version includes a manual vacuum pump with a leak gauge to monitor the effectiveness of the suction.

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Source: Vacuum Cup Octopus with Pump

Vacuum suction cups offer a versatile method of material handling. In fact, suction cups also allow robots to pick different smooth surfaced objects. The approach has been applied to the robotics field since the 1960s. One recent research effort focuses on suction cups that can be used on robots designed to perform tasks in unstructured and contaminated environments. Of course, monitoring the amount of vacuum (negative pressure) with an accurate and rugged microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) pressure sensor can provide an even greater amount of control to more sophisticated suction applications.

Comments/Questions?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
Email us at info@allsensors.com

Sensing in Robotic Cow Milking Machines

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities and you. In this blog we’ll be discussing cows and the role pressure sensors play in automatic milking systems.

Sensing in Robotic Cow Milking Machines

Since the first commercial automatic milking systems (AMS) appeared in 1992, sensing has been an increasingly important aspect to monitor and control the milking process. In fact, guide lines for automatic milking were developed and approved for AMS and the associated sensor technologies within the framework of the International Standards Organization (ISO20966, 2007).

In contrast to a traditional process, that typically involves milking cows twice a day using automatic pumps that have to be manually attached, the automated or robotic systems allow motivated cows to enter as many as four or five times a day. While relieving the pressure of milk in their udders could be a factor, the incentive of food during the process is certainly critical, too. To take advantage of the latest technologies in sensing and other related areas, the first International Precision Dairy Farming Conference was held in 2016, in Leeuwarden, the Netherlands. Cows are an increasing part of the internet of things (IoT).

In the milking process, vacuum is used to extract the milk and is the main milking machine factor affecting milk flow rate. Common practice uses a level of about half atmospheric pressure (i.e., 40–50 kPa, 300–375 mm/Hg).

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Source: http://www.fao.org/docrep/004/t0218e/T0218E02.htm

In addition to pressure sensing for the vacuum, flow rate and pump monitoring in the system, other sensors include RFID, temperature, conductivity, color and more.

What do you think/Comments?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let me know and I’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
-Han Mai, Senior Marketing Specialist, All Sensors Corporation (hmai@allsensors.com)

Media Isolated Pressure Sensors

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities and you. In this blog we’ll be discussing media isolated pressure sensors.

Media Isolated Pressure Sensors

Unlike many other sensor applications, pressure sensors frequently have to contact some pretty nasty chemicals. Sensor manufacturers usually qualify their sensors for restricted usage with statements such as “intended for use with non-corrosive, non-ionic working fluids such as air, dry gases, etc.” This means that the user who has an application that does not meet these criteria, either cannot use a product that meets all the other application requirements or has to take steps to protect the sensor and assume any risk regarding the protection methodology.

In contrast, sensors designed specifically for harsh environments open many new applications in areas including medical, environmental controls, plant and mechanical engineering as well as automotive. In many cases, the technology changes for these more rugged sensors from a silicon, microelectromechanical system (MEMS) material to a ceramic material but still retains a monolithic design. A flush membrane makes it easy to interface these types of pressure sensors to hydraulic fluids and even extends the pressure range up to 6000 PSI. With the CPM 602 series, All Sensors now participates in these more demanding applications.

CPM 602

A ceramic pressure sensor overcomes many of the limitations of silicon-based MEMS pressure sensors.

What do you think/Comments?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let me know and I’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
-Han Mai, Senior Marketing Specialist, All Sensors Corporation (hmai@allsensors.com)

Special Uses for Pressure Sensors: Improve Your Game

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities and you. In this blog we’ll be discussing pressure towards golf.

Special Uses for Pressure Sensors: Improve Your Game

With sufficient knowledge of an application’s requirements, experts can implement sensors that help experienced or novice players improve their game. An excellent example comes from golf. Avid golfers are always looking for ways to reduce their score and increase their performance and enjoyment of the game.

One company employs several pressure sensors in a golf glove to help users develop the right grip. With the aid of a 1.2-inch built-in display, the glove analyzes the pressure of the swing for real-time audio and visual feedback at 80 times per second. Experts know that a relaxed grip is the key to a powerful, consistent and natural golf swing. The glove warns users if they exceed a target level of grip pressure and even shows which fingers are gripping too tightly. Perhaps the biggest surprise is that an app or smartphone are not required to provide this capability. Makes you want to get your hands around other problems where sensing could provide a solution.

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The right grip pressure improves performance in golf. Image courtesy of SensoGlove. 

What do you think/Comments?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let me know and I’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
-Han Mai, Senior Marketing Specialist, All Sensors Corporation (hmai@allsensors.com)