Pressure and Gas Chromatography

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Gas chromatography uses stationary and mobile phases for separating and analyzing mixtures according to “Chromatography Composition Measurement,” in The Measurement, Instrumentation, and Sensors Handbook. To perform the necessary steps, the typical gas chromatograph has several different aspects. It starts with a pressure regulated carrier gas supply. The carrier gas pressures are typically 34 to 69 kPa (5 to 10 psig) to 138 to 340 kPa (20 to 50 psig) at gas flow rates of 1 mL min-1 or less. If the data system monitors and records the supplied pressures, pressure sensors would also be used.

To measure this range of pressures, All Sensors SPM 401 Series of media isolated sensors would provide a good solution since process control and monitoring systems are target applications.

Gas Chromatograph

The components of a gas chromatograph include regulating gas pressure.  Source: http://faculty.uml.edu/david_ryan/84.314/Instrumental%20Lecture%2016.pdf

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Pressure for Emergencies

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Safely evacuating a building in emergency situations can be accomplished with the pressure stored in compressed air containers. An inflatable escape chute allows people trapped in locations up to four stories high to easily slide to the ground. With the proper pressure in the canister, the slide can be fully inflated in less than 6 seconds. The safety system is reasonably obscure when not in use, but a manual inside activation of the pressurized container brings the system to life. The system strictly uses pressure to ensure operation even during power failure situations.

Slide to Safety - SlideImages courtesy of Slide to Safety

With the sensors that are embedded in each unit, an operator can remotely monitor the air pressure in the tank to ensure that it is within correct limits and can also determine if tampering has occurred.

Manufactured by Slide to Safety, the company’s Rapid Evacuation System (RES) was developed after the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting. However, it has potential applications in colleges, universities, commercial offices, residences, apartment buildings, motels and hotels, hospitals, government facilities or any multi-storied building.

Slide to Safety - Rapid Evacuation System

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Optimal Pressure for Clean Teeth

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Optimal Pressure for Clean Teeth

While some electric toothbrushes use pulsating water jets or oral irrigators with water pressures between 10 to 100 psi, some ultrasonic technology toothbrushes now integrate a pressure sensor to avoid brushing too hard. With their built-in pressure sensors, Philips ProtectiveClean or DiamondClean Smart series of toothbrushes have at least three modes and three intensities.

If the user is brushing too hard, the toothbrush handle vibrates and makes a pulsing sound as a reminder to not exert as much pressure. Other toothbrush manufacturers, such as the Oral-B Genius Pro 8000, have also integrated pressure sensors into their toothbrushes. This indicates that users are receiving value and willing to pay more, sometimes a lot more, for these premium types of toothbrushes. With a pressure sensor, the user can optimize the cleaning process and avoid damage to gums and even teeth.

While manufacturers reveal no information about the pressures involved, a university study from the 1970s found that 19.53 gm/mm2 (191.5 kPa or 27.8 psi or 1437 mm Hg) ±6.48 gm/mm2 (63.55kPa or 9.22 psi or 477 mm Hg) typically resulted from using a hard bristle toothbrush with lower pressures for soft and powered toothbrushes.

Koninklijke Philips N.V.  Sonicare ProtectiveClean 6100

Figure courtesy of Koninklijke Philips N.V.

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Piezoresistive MEMS Pressure Sensors Growth

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Piezoresistive MEMS Pressure Sensors Growth

A new report is available for pressure sensors from MarketResearch titled, “Pressure Sensor Market by Technology Advancement, Growth and Forecasts 2027.”

Over the forecast period, increasing technological advancements in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology as well as the rising adoption of this technology in connected devices are key factors driving growth. Of the analyzed technologies of piezoresistive, electromagnetic, capacitive, resonant solid state, and optical, piezoresistive technology is expected to enjoy the highest share in the market during this timeframe. Factors inhibiting growth include technical problems in integration and packaging processes and lack of a standard fabrication process.

While the market is segmented into automotive, oil & gas, consumer electronics, medical, industrial sector, and others, consumer electronics are expected to register significant share of revenue growth over the forecast period.

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Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
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