Tag Archives: pressure sensor

The Pressures of a Modern Lifestyle

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

The Pressures of a Modern Lifestyle

After a restful night’s sleep, possibly in a water (<<28 mmHg) bed or on an air (<1 psi) mattress, the day begins with the flushing of a toilet, washing of hands and a relaxing shower. All these daily routines need adequate water pressure (40 to 45 psi). More water pressure is needed to get the filtered water (20-40 psi) for coffee. In many cases, the coffee is made by a pressurized (130.5 ± 14.5 psi) coffee/expresso machine. Before leaving home, a pressurized (10-100 psi) water-powered toothbrush could be used to clean the teeth.

The trip to work or wherever in a personal vehicle would almost always require riding on pressurized rubber tires whether it is a car, truck, motorcycle or even a bicycle (< 135 psi). If the vehicle is a car with an internal combustion engine, cylinder pressure provides the power to propel it and, in some cases, a turbocharger provides even more input air pressure. Hydraulic pressure provides the braking (800-2000 psi) and steering (80-125 psi).

Back at home after whatever the day has meant, it is cool thanks to the air conditioning compressor (<100 to >345 psi) and air delivery by the fan (1-in water column) through a clean air filter (<250 Pa). To relax, a pressurized bottle of liquid, perhaps a soda (30-50 psi), beer (<45 psi) or even sparkling wine (70-90 psi) is in order. With the stress of the day behind, your blood pressure (120/80 mmHg) and breathing (respiratory pressure) are probably the lowest they have been all day. Of course, the entire day occurred in atmospheric pressure whether it was near the ocean (14.7 psi) or in a mountain cabin at 1 mile above sea level (6.9 psi).

As another round of flushing, washing and brushing ends the day, the typical person is unaware of the value pressure has meant to their day to increase comfort, convenience and safety as well as save time and provide essential well-being. If they wanted to measure, monitor or control any of these or many other pressures, All Sensors has the pressure sensors to do the job.

Comments/Questions?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
Email us at info@allsensors.com

Pressure for a Relaxing (and Safe) Experience

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Pressure for a Relaxing (and Safe) Experience

Traveling in a floating hotel, otherwise known as a cruise ship. can be a great way to relax and even experience some great adventures. However, things can happen to destroy what could be a once-in-a-lifetime experience. This includes a problem such as lack of water to any of the passenger’s cabins that is not resolved in a reasonable amount of time. Also, that same or possibly separate water supply needs to be available to provide water for the sprinkling system in the event that a fire should break out. As shown in this picture, the cruise ship designer makes it easy for maintenance people and others responsible for the safety systems on the ship to easily inspect the water supply system in various locations on the ship – so easy that even passengers can monitor the system themselves. However, for those locations to be remotely monitored, instead of a mechanical gauge, a sensor with an electrical output is required. Such a sensor would allow monitoring of numerous remote locations from the bridge without requiring anyone to go and inspect the gauges.

Cruise Ship Sprinkler System

With similar readings of 2.5 bar, the sprinkler system in Station 42 is OK.

In some marine sprinkler systems, a pressurized tank with a minimum of 4.5 bar is maintained for the highest level sprinkler. For any of these designs, one of All Sensors SPA 402 Series Pressure Sensors would provide a good solution for remote monitoring.

Comments/Questions?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
Email us at info@allsensors.com

NEW Media Isolated Millivolt Pressure Sensors

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities and you. In this blog we’ll be discussing our new media isolated pressure sensors.

NEW Media Isolated Millivolt Pressure Sensors

All Sensors has a brand new offering of media isolated pressure sensors. The first line released is the ceramic CPM 602 Series. These new pressure sensors offer design engineers excellent performance in various applications, especially for low-cost solutions.

Product Features

  • Pressure ranges 30 to 6000 psi gauge
  • Piezoresistive monolithic
  • Excellent chemical resistance
  • Supply voltage 2 to 30 VDC
  • Total error better 4% FS

Applications

  • Medical
  • Environmental Controls
  • Plant and Mechanical Engineering
  • Automotive

See more information here. Datasheet download here.

What do you think/Comments?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let me know and I’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
-Han Mai, Senior Marketing Specialist, All Sensors Corporation (hmai@allsensors.com)

Critical Flight Measurements Using Pressure

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities and you. In this blog we’ll be discussing critical flight measurements using pressure.

Critical Flight Measurements Using Pressure

Amplifying the low level signal from a higher pressure range sensor for a low pressure application can frequently lead to unacceptable noise problems in the application. This can occur if the sensor supplier performs this task as part of an amplified and signal-conditioned product offering or if the customer performs the amplification and signal conditioning. The limitation is inherently in the sensor die. Specially designed lower pressure range sensors, such as All Sensors DLVR Series mini digital output pressure sensors offer a solution to the noise problem.  The low mass, high-sensitivity die are less sensitive to errors due to vibration or changes in time, temperature and position.

All Sensors’ CoBeam2 TM die technology achieves a high level of pressure sensitivity without using boss structures and larger die topologies commonly used in microelectromechanical system (MEMS) designs. This design approach significantly reduces gravity and vibration sensitivities. As shown in Figure 1, CoBeam2 technology combines bonded strain gage sensor insight with state of the art MEMS processing.

31A

Figure 1 MEMS pressure sensor die using CoBeam2 technology

Figure 2 shows active dual-die compensation with electrical cross coupling of the sensors’ outputs and pneumatic cross coupling of the pressure used in the DLVR Series and other All Sensor products. By performing both electrical and pneumatic cross coupling, the signal strength is not reduced and the common mode error compensation is optimized. Some products use just the electrical cross coupling. Pressure Point 4: Dual Die Compensation for MEMS Pressure Sensors provides more details. Combined with CoBeam2 Technology, the amplified, digital output sensor reduces many errors associated with pressure measurements.

31B

(a)                                                                                      (b)

Figure 2  (a) Electrical cross coupling compensation of active die (Die 1) using a reference die (Die 2) and (b) pneumatic cross coupling compensation using fluidic channels in the pressure sensor package.

Drones, multicopters, quadcopters, small unmanned air vehicles (UAVs) and micro air vehicles (MAVs)  are not only the rage in modern flying craft, they are among the applications that can benefit from the improved sensor performance of a small form factor MEMS sensor.  Low pressure sensors such as the 1 inH2O DLVR-L01D up to the 10 inH2O DLVR-L10D can be used for measuring differential pressure on the wing in multiple locations to provide improved control and stability. Higher pressure ranges are also available.

Wind tunnel testing has traditionally used several pressure sensors on the wings of a test aircraft to provide a pressure-based estimation of the flow field above an airfoil. Recently, for increased control in drones, aerodynamics-based feedback using onboard active flow control schemes relies on a set of pressure measurements taken across the aircraft through pressure ports and through multi-hole probes. The aerodynamic feedback can be especially useful when switching control modes during various flight conditions.

Highly turbulent situations can also pose attitude control difficulties for fixed-wing MAVs. In Bioinspired Wing-Surface Pressure Sensing for Attitude Control of Micro Air Vehicles, researchers are investigating alternate technique using pressure sensors to solve this problem.

Other flight measurements can benefit from highly stable pressure sensors. For example, the DLV-015A DLV Series mini digital output absolute sensor can provide the barometer or altimeter readings in these same aircraft.

CoBeam2 is a trademark of All Sensors Corporation.

What do you think/Comments?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let me know and I’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
-Han Mai, Senior Marketing Specialist, All Sensors Corporation (hmai@allsensors.com)