Tag Archives: pressure sensor

Vacuum-Sealed Culinary Preservation and Preparation

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Vacuum-Sealed Culinary Preservation and Preparation

Vacuum sealing protects and preserves food and other perishable products. Both edge-style and chamber-style vacuum sealers are used for this process.  With chamber-style vacuum sealers, the negative pressures in the chamber and inside the bag are nearly always the same. These vacuum sealers also enable special culinary techniques including vacuum-compression or vacuum-infusion.

The vacuum sealing process simply consists of placing the food inside the chamber and closing the lid. Reducing the pressure to 5–50 mbar and then sealing the bag produces a tightly sealed package for most solid foods. A vacuum level of 50 millibars removes about 95% of the atmosphere and at 5 millibars about 99.5% of the air inside the chamber and packing is gone.

A unit like the VacMaster PRO350 Professional Vacuum Sealer has a control panel with pre-set vacuum settings and a digital display of the vacuum level for easy operation. In contrast, the VacMaster VP320 Counter Top Commercial Chamber Vacuum Sealer has a gauge to provide visual feedback to the operator.

VacMaster PRO350 Professional Vacuum SealerVacMaster VP320 Counter Top Commercial Chamber Vacuum Sealer

Note the digital display (a)  and mechanical gauge (b) on these chamber-style vacuum sealers. Source: VacMaster.

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The Pressure for Safety in Gas Stations

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

The Pressure for Safety in Gas Stations

For safe fuel storage and delivery, frequent maintenance and monitoring of the equipment in gasoline stations is certainly advised and may be required by federal and/or local legislation. In addition to the hazards presented by leaks, they are also costly to the service station operation. In all instances, to prevent or detect problems, pressure measurements are essential.

For example, static pressure testing for fuel lines and gas stations requires a pressure gauge to ensure that everything is working properly and not leaking.  Test equipment to verify this performance can range from sophisticated and expensive to straightforward and cheap.

Gas Station Fuel Gauge

The 50 psi (345 kpa) static pressure reading. Note fuel in the gauge.

Stage II Vapor Recovery Control

For many years, Stage II Vapor Recovery Control in gas stations (aka gasoline dispensing facilities or GDFs) was required by many regions in the U.S. To quantify the vapor tightness of vapor recovery systems installed at GDFs equipped with pressure/vacuum (P/V) valves, the designed pressure setting of the P/V valves has to be a minimum of 2.5 inches of water column (inches H2O) to verify the 2-inch water closet (WC) static pressure performance of the system.

However, since the early 2000s, many vehicles have been equipped with onboard refueling vapor recovery (ORVR) systems. These ORVR controls have essentially eliminated the need for Stage II vapor recovery systems in service stations.

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Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
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Water Pistol Pressure

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Water Pistol Pressure

Q. How do you elevate the basic water pistol experience?

A. By giving it more pressure.

Operating similar to the opposite of a hydraulic jack, a common water pistol employs Pascal’s Principle for a fluid at rest in a closed container: a pressure change in one part is transmitted without loss to every portion of the fluid and to the walls of the container. In equation form, it’s:

P1=F1/A1=P2=F2/A2

For the pressure to remain constant, if A1=n*A2, then F1=n*F2.

SuperSoaker water pressure

To take the water pistol to the next level, NASA engineer Lonnie Johnson conceived of the idea of a pressurized water gun with a pressure reservoir that became the Super Soaker. The ultimate Super Soaker used a constant pressure system (CPS) with a separate compression chamber that contained a thick-walled rubber balloon.

While the difference in the length and amount of the output (flow) of a standard water pistol vs. the Super Soaker vs. the CPS 2000 Mark1 Super Soaker is discussed in several blogs, the pressure in each is not. Those interested in pressure will just have to make their own measurements. All Sensors’ SPM 401 Series or CPM 602 Series pressure sensors with media isolation could provide those measurements.

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Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
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Pressure in Carbonated Beverages

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Pressure in Carbonated Beverages

In beverages such as beer and sodas and even water, pressure makes them better. In some cases, without the pressure, due to aging or simply leaving the container’s contents exposed to air, the beverage goes flat and is undrinkable.

The sugar content of homemade beer can create pressure differences from 36 psi for a high sugar content to 30 psi for half of that level. Commercial beers typically have carbonation that creates pressures up to 45 psi. Carbonated soft drinks typically have pressures from 30 to 50 psi. The actual pressure for a specific container/content combination can vary based on temperature, altitude and shaking.

Image via Alexander Kaiser, pooliestudios.comImage via Alexander Kaiser, pooliestudios.com

While a pressure sensor on a bottle or can does not make any sense, commercial suppliers and even home brewers need to know what levels to expect so they can package their bubbly beverage in a safe container. In a production process, monitoring pressure of the carbonation source and sampling bottle/can pressures can also ensure consistent quality of the end product. In either case, pressure measurements provide valuable information.

Comments/Questions?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
Email us at info@allsensors.com