Oxygen Tank Pressure

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Oxygen Tank Pressure

For many reasons, patients that require additional oxygen use storage tanks with compressed oxygen to supplement their normal air intake.  The size and subsequent capacity of the tank may vary but the full pressure is typically about 2,000 psi and can go as high as 3,000 psi. With this pressure level in the tank, a regulator converts the supplied pressure to a lower, and much safer, level for the user. With newer aluminum and other materials instead of steel to avoid magnetism problems in situations such Magnetic resonance Imaging (MRI) tests, the pressure level is lower. Minimum pressure in tanks is around 300 psi with delivery systems operating at pressure below 400 psi. In contrast, the storage and delivery system of liquid oxygen in a hospital, pressures are usually around 50.0–55.1 psi. The amount of oxygen present inside the cylinder is measured by the pressure at the outlet nozzle.

PV/T = constant

where P is pressure in the cylinder,

V is the volume of the cylinder,

and T is the temperature

Applied Home Healthcare Equipment

Image courtesy of Applied Home Healthcare Equipment.

Normal clean air contains 19% to 21% oxygen. In contrast, a supply of 60% oxygen with 40% nitrogen is considered acceptable for most clinical purposes but usually high much higher content is available.

Portable oxygen cylinders often have flow and pressure gauges. They provide easy, on sight measurements for a user. However, remote monitoring can use microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) pressure sensors to provide an electrical signal that can be transmitted to one or more receivers.  With this information displayed remotely, a variety of healthcare givers can access and use the information.

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Correct Pressures for Medical Procedures

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Correct Pressures for Medical Procedures

Gas control, medical control systems, air compressors and vacuum pumps are all possible equipment used in a medical or even a veterinary office. In all of these systems, monitoring and controlling the pressure is necessary to achieve the proper, efficient and safe values.

Patton's Medical gas control panel for nitrogenThe Patton’s Medical gas control panel for nitrogen clearly shows the supply (95 psi) and outlet (82 psi) pressures.

While gages are commonly used so medical personnel can easily observe the pressures during a procedure, microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) sensors could easily be installed behind the panel and then communicate the data to a local or remote monitoring station. With digital data, warnings can be implemented and archived data can be used to show that proper levels of critical elements, such as oxygen, were maintained during an operation.

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Piezoresistive MEMS Pressure Sensors Growth

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Piezoresistive MEMS Pressure Sensors Growth

A new report is available for pressure sensors from MarketResearch titled, “Pressure Sensor Market by Technology Advancement, Growth and Forecasts 2027.”

Over the forecast period, increasing technological advancements in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology as well as the rising adoption of this technology in connected devices are key factors driving growth. Of the analyzed technologies of piezoresistive, electromagnetic, capacitive, resonant solid state, and optical, piezoresistive technology is expected to enjoy the highest share in the market during this timeframe. Factors inhibiting growth include technical problems in integration and packaging processes and lack of a standard fabrication process.

While the market is segmented into automotive, oil & gas, consumer electronics, medical, industrial sector, and others, consumer electronics are expected to register significant share of revenue growth over the forecast period.

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Fan Static Pressure

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Fan Static Pressure

Fan static pressure is one of the two parameters that define the performance of a fan. The other, and more common, is the volume of air the fan delivers per minute or per hour. Fan static pressure is the resistance pressure the fan has to blow against to move air in the desired direction.

For PC gamers, high airflow and high-pressure static fans are two distinct classifications. High-pressure static fans are used on radiators, central processing unit (CPU) and graphic processing unit GPU coolers, in front of hard drives, and other places where airflow might otherwise be blocked by an object. Because of their high-pressure capability, they can overcome the restrictions caused by the blockage.

Cooler Master Masterfan Pro 120 Air Pressure Fan

The Masterfan Pro 120 Air Pressure Fan is ideal for funneling concentrated air short distances at hot components or through tight spaces.  Image courtesy of Cooler Master.

In wood drying operations, kiln static pressure is not a constant and depends upon the performance of the fan chosen. For example, replacing a small fan generating 45,000 cubic feet per minute (cfm) at an estimated pressure of 0.5 inches H2O in a kiln with a larger fan rated at 60,000 cfm at 0.5 inches of H2O will not achieve 60,000 cfm. The actual air flow will be less than 60,000 cfm due to the rise in the static pressure – a situation that can cause complications in the end application.

In heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) systems, static pressure measures the effectiveness of the fan to the ducts in a particular installation.  If the static pressure is too high, the HVAC unit will have to work harder to push the air through the duct work.

In all of these low-pressure situations, an accurate microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) pressure sensor with a digital output, such as All Sensors DLLR Series, can address the manufacturing, installation verification or ongoing operation measurements.

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Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
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