Tag Archives: MEMS

Pressure Makes Great Sparkling Wines

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Pressure Makes Great Sparkling Wines

Interested in a little taste of the bubbly? Well, why not? The effervescence adds a substantial taste difference to wine that many people enjoy. Opening a bottle may be a little tricky based on the pressure inside of it. Depending on the wine and the manufacturer, the pressure typically can range from 70 to 90 psi. That’s about five to over six times atmospheric pressure. No wonder the cork can fly across the room if the proper precautions are not taken.

Champagne Under Pressure

Source: https://www.finedininglovers.com/stories/champagne-bottle-secrets/

In Champagne and other sparkling wines, the pressure is created by carbon dioxide, which forms naturally as yeast interacts with grape sugars. Different fermenting, bottling methods and the type of grapes as well as aging are key factors in the actual pressure inside the bottle.

For example, the pressure in a Champagne bottle from France is about 6 bar (90 psi) and, in contrast, a bottle of Prosecco, from northeast Italy, has a pressure of about 3.5 bar (51 psi). Since it has to withstand more pressure, Champagne actually uses a heavier bottle, something a winery would want to know to avoid problems. While putting a pressure sensor on each bottle of wine is impractical, testing each manufactured bottle or at least verifying the manufacturing processes’ capability to consistently provide bottles that can withstand a maximum pressure is just a good manufacturing practice. For these applications, the accuracy and cost effectiveness of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) pressure sensors that can measure 100 psi certainly makes sense.

Comments/Questions?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
Email us at info@allsensors.com

 

Large Pressure Drop Indicates a Bomb Cyclone

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Large Pressure Drop Indicates a Bomb Cyclone

One of the first weather oddities to hit the United States in 2018 was the bomb cyclone, or bombogenesis, as meteorologists call it. This type of winter storm with unusually low temperatures is indicated by a low pressure drop of at least 24 millibars (0.35 psi) in 24 hours. With normal pressures around 1000 millibars (14.7 psia) near sea level, this represents a 2.3% change from the normal reading.

In this year’s bomb cyclone, the pressure dropped by 54 millibars in 24 hours, more than twice the standard criteria, indicating a very strong storm. In fact, it was considered one of the greatest rapidly deepening rates ever observed by the National Weather Service.

With the continuous resolution capabilities of microelectromechanical (MEMS) pressure sensors, even the change of a few millibars can be easily observed with an absolute pressure sensor.

NOAA GOES-16 Weather Satellite

The 2018 bomb cyclone as observed from the GOES-16 weather satellite, which is operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

Comments/Questions?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
Email us at info@allsensors.com

Progression of MEMS Pressure Sensing

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

At Sensors Expo 2017, Jim Brownell, one of All Sensors’ sales managers, explained the progression of microelectromechanical system (MEMS) pressure sensing over the past 30+ years from All Sensors’ perspective.

Check out that interview here, courtesy of EE World Online’s Sensor Tips.

 

Comments/Questions?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
Email us at info@allsensors.com

Media Isolated Pressure Sensors

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities and you. In this blog we’ll be discussing media isolated pressure sensors.

Media Isolated Pressure Sensors

Unlike many other sensor applications, pressure sensors frequently have to contact some pretty nasty chemicals. Sensor manufacturers usually qualify their sensors for restricted usage with statements such as “intended for use with non-corrosive, non-ionic working fluids such as air, dry gases, etc.” This means that the user who has an application that does not meet these criteria, either cannot use a product that meets all the other application requirements or has to take steps to protect the sensor and assume any risk regarding the protection methodology.

In contrast, sensors designed specifically for harsh environments open many new applications in areas including medical, environmental controls, plant and mechanical engineering as well as automotive. In many cases, the technology changes for these more rugged sensors from a silicon, microelectromechanical system (MEMS) material to a ceramic material but still retains a monolithic design. A flush membrane makes it easy to interface these types of pressure sensors to hydraulic fluids and even extends the pressure range up to 6000 PSI. With the CPM 602 series, All Sensors now participates in these more demanding applications.

CPM 602

A ceramic pressure sensor overcomes many of the limitations of silicon-based MEMS pressure sensors.

What do you think/Comments?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let me know and I’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
-Han Mai, Senior Marketing Specialist, All Sensors Corporation (hmai@allsensors.com)