Tag Archives: All Sensors

The Value of Pressure

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

The Value of Pressure

Pressure makes diamonds” ― George S. Patton Jr.

While Patton was referring to the stress that can transition those who survive it into better individuals, carbon subjected to intense pressure and heat for millions of years turns into diamonds. In fact, the right combination of heat, pressure and time can crystallize many other minerals.

For natural diamonds, the pressure results from their formation at depths of 140 to 190 kilometers (87 to 118 mi) in the Earth’s mantle – below the Earth’s crust.

The Hope Diamond

The Hope Diamond

When Tracy Hall achieved the first commercially successful synthesis of diamond in 1954, a more specific pressure value was identified. Hall used a “belt” press, which was capable of producing pressures above 10 GPa (1,500,000 psi) and temperatures above 2,000 °C (3,630 °F).

Pressure is essential in creating diamonds and other precious gems, but its greatest value is in healthcare. Without your health, everything else means nothing. Blood pressure, respiratory flow, interocular pressure and other pressure measurements indicate good health or a health problem. Cost-effective microelectromechanical (MEMS) pressure sensors provide value by confirming good health or helping diagnose problems to correct them and restore good health.

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Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
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The Pressure in Hyperbaric Chamber Healing

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

The Pressure in Hyperbaric Chamber Healing

In Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT), a patient breathes 100% oxygen intermittently while inside a treatment chamber maintained at a pressure higher than sea level pressure (>1 atmosphere absolute). The patient inhales the oxygen within the chamber, where the pressurization could be 1.4 atmosphere absolute or higher.

HBOT can be a primary treatment or used to supplement surgical or pharmacologic approaches to healing. Specific medical uses include:

  1. Air or gas embolism
  2. Carbon monoxide poisoning
  3. Gas gangrene
  4. Crush Injuries, compartment syndrome (excessive pressure inside an enclosed muscle space in the body) and other acute traumatic ischemias (inadequate supply of blood to organs and body tissues)
  5. Decompression sickness
  6. Inadequate blood flow in arteries
  7. Severe anemia
  8. Intracranial abscess
  9. Dermatological disorders, such as Necrotizing Soft Tissue Infections
  10. Compromised grafts and flaps
  11. Acute thermal burn injury
  12. Sudden deafness

 

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT)Hyperbaric Oxygen Chamber (HBOT)

Effective HBOT treatment involves controlling three parameters: %O2, pressure, and time. While, mechanical analog gauges are the standard method for measuring pressure in commercially available hyperbaric chambers and are typically accurate only to within ±2% of full scale, digital pressure gauges with considerably greater accuracy and remote monitoring and control capability are being considered. A recent patent for a hyperbaric chamber suction system, including hyperbaric oxygen chamber, proposes the use of two electrically connected digital pressure gauges with an externally connected digital display as well as electrical solenoid valves and a programmable logic controller (PLC) to maintain desired pressure levels.

Comments/Questions?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
Email us at info@allsensors.com

The Pressure for Healthy Teeth

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

The Pressure for Healthy Teeth

Pulsating dental water jets or oral irrigators have been used for dental healthcare for over 50 years. The pulsating stream of water and special tips provide a treatment for braces, sensitive teeth, plaque and gingivitis. One manufacturer offers countertop water flossers with 3, 6, or 10 pressure settings ranging from 10–90 or 10-100 PSI and cordless water flossers with 2 or 3 pressure settings from 45–75 PSI.

Water Flossers - Countertop vs. Cordless

The pressure range and adjustability vary depending on the type of water flosser.

With the lowest (1) setting of 10 PSI and the highest (10) setting of 100 PSI, the ten adjustments steps on one model provide approximately 10 psi increments between steps. The user does not have to relate to the actual pressure but just know that if they have sensitive teeth they want to start with the #1 step (10 psi). Experienced users often use the higher-pressure settings. Since the pressure settings are all relative, a pressure sensor is not required in the flosser. However, as in any product that involves pressure, the design pressures need to be verified by laboratory testing to establish the typical and maximum pressure settings and verified in manufacturing for consistent quality using highly accurate pressure sensors.

Comments/Questions?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
Email us at info@allsensors.com

Steam Pressure

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Steam Pressure

Today, displacing gasoline or diesel powered engines by electrically-powered motors is the goal of extensive renewable energy efforts. Before the fossil fuel powered machines, the steam engine powered the Industrial Revolution and dominated industry and transportation for 150 years with coal providing the primary fuel to heat the water in the boiler.

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A scaled down model train that uses steam power.

Live steam or steam under pressure created by boiling water is still used to operate some machinery and has a cult following in scale model trains. For safety purposes, the engineer monitors the pressure in the boiler.  The pressure is measured by a mechanical gauge and controlled by a safety valve that relieves excessive pressure. Typical operating pressures are in the 200 to 250 psi range. In these trains, any digital sensing technique would be quite out of place.

Inner Workings of a Steam Engine

Several pressure measurements can be made for the engineer to safely control the steam engine.

Comments/Questions?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
Email us at info@allsensors.com