Tag Archives: air pressure

The Pressures of a Modern Lifestyle

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

The Pressures of a Modern Lifestyle

After a restful night’s sleep, possibly in a water (<<28 mmHg) bed or on an air (<1 psi) mattress, the day begins with the flushing of a toilet, washing of hands and a relaxing shower. All these daily routines need adequate water pressure (40 to 45 psi). More water pressure is needed to get the filtered water (20-40 psi) for coffee. In many cases, the coffee is made by a pressurized (130.5 ± 14.5 psi) coffee/expresso machine. Before leaving home, a pressurized (10-100 psi) water-powered toothbrush could be used to clean the teeth.

The trip to work or wherever in a personal vehicle would almost always require riding on pressurized rubber tires whether it is a car, truck, motorcycle or even a bicycle (< 135 psi). If the vehicle is a car with an internal combustion engine, cylinder pressure provides the power to propel it and, in some cases, a turbocharger provides even more input air pressure. Hydraulic pressure provides the braking (800-2000 psi) and steering (80-125 psi).

Back at home after whatever the day has meant, it is cool thanks to the air conditioning compressor (<100 to >345 psi) and air delivery by the fan (1-in water column) through a clean air filter (<250 Pa). To relax, a pressurized bottle of liquid, perhaps a soda (30-50 psi), beer (<45 psi) or even sparkling wine (70-90 psi) is in order. With the stress of the day behind, your blood pressure (120/80 mmHg) and breathing (respiratory pressure) are probably the lowest they have been all day. Of course, the entire day occurred in atmospheric pressure whether it was near the ocean (14.7 psi) or in a mountain cabin at 1 mile above sea level (6.9 psi).

As another round of flushing, washing and brushing ends the day, the typical person is unaware of the value pressure has meant to their day to increase comfort, convenience and safety as well as save time and provide essential well-being. If they wanted to measure, monitor or control any of these or many other pressures, All Sensors has the pressure sensors to do the job.

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Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
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The Pressure in Bubble Packs

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

The Pressure in Bubble Packs

Sort of a pre-inflated airbag system for fragile or even not so fragile products, Bubble Wrap® protects numerous shipments from in-transit and rough handling damage caused by shock, vibration or abrasion. These modern-day marvels are an array of small (¼-inch diameter) to rather large (1-inch diameter) air pockets sealed between two thin plastic layers.

Over 60 years ago, the inventors created bubble wrap by laminating two plastic sheets with air bubbles in between. Today, the company they founded, Sealed Air Corporation, provides several types of bubble wrap products for food handling, medical, electronics and other applications. Many of the products have unique properties for a specific application, such as anti-static material for electronics packaging.

The air pocket is created by a pressure of only a few psi above atmospheric pressure. However, with sufficient external pressure applied, the bubbles will pop, providing stress relief for an untold number of users.

Sealed Air Corporation Bubble Pack

Source: Sealed Air Corporation https://sealedair.com/

Comments/Questions?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
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The Pressure in Hyperbaric Chamber Healing

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

The Pressure in Hyperbaric Chamber Healing

In Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT), a patient breathes 100% oxygen intermittently while inside a treatment chamber maintained at a pressure higher than sea level pressure (>1 atmosphere absolute). The patient inhales the oxygen within the chamber, where the pressurization could be 1.4 atmosphere absolute or higher.

HBOT can be a primary treatment or used to supplement surgical or pharmacologic approaches to healing. Specific medical uses include:

  1. Air or gas embolism
  2. Carbon monoxide poisoning
  3. Gas gangrene
  4. Crush Injuries, compartment syndrome (excessive pressure inside an enclosed muscle space in the body) and other acute traumatic ischemias (inadequate supply of blood to organs and body tissues)
  5. Decompression sickness
  6. Inadequate blood flow in arteries
  7. Severe anemia
  8. Intracranial abscess
  9. Dermatological disorders, such as Necrotizing Soft Tissue Infections
  10. Compromised grafts and flaps
  11. Acute thermal burn injury
  12. Sudden deafness

 

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT)Hyperbaric Oxygen Chamber (HBOT)

Effective HBOT treatment involves controlling three parameters: %O2, pressure, and time. While, mechanical analog gauges are the standard method for measuring pressure in commercially available hyperbaric chambers and are typically accurate only to within ±2% of full scale, digital pressure gauges with considerably greater accuracy and remote monitoring and control capability are being considered. A recent patent for a hyperbaric chamber suction system, including hyperbaric oxygen chamber, proposes the use of two electrically connected digital pressure gauges with an externally connected digital display as well as electrical solenoid valves and a programmable logic controller (PLC) to maintain desired pressure levels.

Comments/Questions?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
Email us at info@allsensors.com

Progression of MEMS Pressure Sensing

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

At Sensors Expo 2017, Jim Brownell, one of All Sensors’ sales managers, explained the progression of microelectromechanical system (MEMS) pressure sensing over the past 30+ years from All Sensors’ perspective.

Check out that interview here, courtesy of EE World Online’s Sensor Tips.

 

Comments/Questions?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
Email us at info@allsensors.com