Tag Archives: air pressure

Widget Pressure

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Widget Pressure

Inside a can of Guinness and a few other beers, a plastic widget releases pressure when the can is opened and exposed to atmospheric pressure. While the process is explained briefly and to the extent that a typical beer drinker cares to know on the can, there are a few other compelling technical aspects that someone involved with or interested in pressure sensing might want to know.

For one, the widget is a patented approach to solving a problem that a canned stout beer, like Guinness, has compared to typical lager or lighter beer or ale. For the later types, carbonating the beer with carbon dioxide (CO2) is sufficient to give the beer its expected head when the beer is poured. In contrast, Guinness and some other beers are expected to have a smoother head. With a widget in the can, these beers have the desired, much creamier, longer lasting head that the draft version has.

The 3-cm diameter widget looks like a ping pong ball but it has a laser-drilled, 0.61-mm pinhole in it. In the canning process, in addition to filling the with CO2 and nitrogen (N2) supersaturated stout, liquid N is added to the stout at the end. The liquid N boils off during pasteurization, the top of the can pressurizes and forces the stout into the pod until equilibrium is reached at about 25 psi.

Mug of Beer with widget

When the can is opened, the pressure is released and the small amount of beer in the cavity rapidly escapes through the pinhole providing sufficient agitation to reproduce the tap handle character for the beer. Enough of the technical stuff. It’s time to verify the results.

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Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
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Pressure for an Uplifting Experience

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Pressure for an Uplifting Experience 

When heavy objects need to be lifted, it is common practice to use hydraulic pressure to move them into place. Applications include trucks, diggers, dumpers, excavators, and bulldozers as well as hydraulic cranes. Cranes can lift shipping containers or heavy objects onto buildings or other places. Other applications include something as simple as lifting a garbage receptacle to dump its contents into a refuse truck – a semi-automated process. Of course, the amount of pressure available determines how much weight can be lifted. In some cases, the pressure could be perhaps 34.5 bar (500 PSI) or less. In other cases, it could exceed 689.5 bar (10,000 PSI).

Monitoring the pressure is part of the safety required to avoid accidents from lifting excessively heavy loads and exceeding the limits of the hydraulic system. It can also be helpful in identifying leaks in the system. However, it takes a special type of pressure sensor to be able to interface to the hydraulic fluid and withstand both the chemical and the temperature aspects of the application.

Hydraulics & Pneumatics common pressure bar

The common 1970’s pressure level of 150 bar (2,176 psi) has increased above 450 bar (6,527 psi) since 2010. Source: Hydraulics & Pneumatics.

A hydraulic truck crane that uses counterweights on the back of the cab to keep it from tipping over can have a counterweight gear pump that generates 96.5 bar (1,400 psi). This is much lower than the main pump pressure of 241 bar (3,500 psi).

Comments/Questions?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
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The Pressure for Sterile Medical Equipment

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

The Pressure for Sterile Medical Equipment

Pressure and temperature are well-known medical measurements to indicate a patient’s health or detect an ailment. However, many people are unaware that these same two parameters, in a controlled environment, are essential to any medical or dental procedure that involves reusable instruments. To disinfect and sterilize surgical instruments and hospital equipment, objects are processed through an autoclave that uses high pressure and steam. The temperature, pressure and amount of time required to destroy bacteria, viruses and fungi vary depending on the item being sterilized. For the pressure value, this can be 15 psi above atmospheric pressure, 30 psi or 20 -40 psi for a chemical vapor process. According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), “Pressure serves as a means to obtain the high temperatures necessary to quickly kill microorganisms.”

Temperature and Pressure Gauges

The gauges on the right-hand side of this autoclave indicate temperature and pressure. Photo by PHAA Sarna courtesy of US Navy.

When monitoring and validation data are required, pressure transmitters are used in autoclaves. However, in cases where an autoclave is not available, for example, for rural and home sterilization, a domestic pressure cooker can even be used for sterilizing objects such as needles, syringes, and nursing bottles.

Comments/Questions?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
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The Pressures of a Modern Lifestyle

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

The Pressures of a Modern Lifestyle

After a restful night’s sleep, possibly in a water (<<28 mmHg) bed or on an air (<1 psi) mattress, the day begins with the flushing of a toilet, washing of hands and a relaxing shower. All these daily routines need adequate water pressure (40 to 45 psi). More water pressure is needed to get the filtered water (20-40 psi) for coffee. In many cases, the coffee is made by a pressurized (130.5 ± 14.5 psi) coffee/expresso machine. Before leaving home, a pressurized (10-100 psi) water-powered toothbrush could be used to clean the teeth.

The trip to work or wherever in a personal vehicle would almost always require riding on pressurized rubber tires whether it is a car, truck, motorcycle or even a bicycle (< 135 psi). If the vehicle is a car with an internal combustion engine, cylinder pressure provides the power to propel it and, in some cases, a turbocharger provides even more input air pressure. Hydraulic pressure provides the braking (800-2000 psi) and steering (80-125 psi).

Back at home after whatever the day has meant, it is cool thanks to the air conditioning compressor (<100 to >345 psi) and air delivery by the fan (1-in water column) through a clean air filter (<250 Pa). To relax, a pressurized bottle of liquid, perhaps a soda (30-50 psi), beer (<45 psi) or even sparkling wine (70-90 psi) is in order. With the stress of the day behind, your blood pressure (120/80 mmHg) and breathing (respiratory pressure) are probably the lowest they have been all day. Of course, the entire day occurred in atmospheric pressure whether it was near the ocean (14.7 psi) or in a mountain cabin at 1 mile above sea level (6.9 psi).

As another round of flushing, washing and brushing ends the day, the typical person is unaware of the value pressure has meant to their day to increase comfort, convenience and safety as well as save time and provide essential well-being. If they wanted to measure, monitor or control any of these or many other pressures, All Sensors has the pressure sensors to do the job.

Comments/Questions?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
Email us at info@allsensors.com