Pressure Sensors in Medical Applications

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Pressure Sensors in Medical Applications

According to a recent market report from Mordor Intelligence, a market intelligence and advisory service, the medical sensors market was valued at USD 12.36 billion in 2019 and is expected to reach a value of USD 20.72 billion by 2025, increasing at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 9.07% over the forecast period (2020 – 2025). The report identifies the significant role that pressure sensors play in medical sensor market. Specific pressure sensor applications include:

  • respiratory breathing circuits (nebulizers, spirometers, patient monitoring)
  • flow/pressure control (therapeutic hospital beds)
  • gas collection (hospital gas supply, oxygen concentrators)
  • sampling/gas flow (blood analysis, gas chromatography, analytical instrument sampling systems)

A specific example of a home health system is continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) respiratory therapy equipment that can use high sensitivity and accurate pressure sensors.

Also, to avoid poor inhaler techniques that prevent patients from receiving their full therapeutic benefits when using inhalers, some medical equipment manufacturers use pressure sensors in inhalers so individuals can receive proper asthma treatment.

All Sensors offers different types of pressure sensors for many medical applications.

Typical components and potential locations for pressure sensors in a ventilator

Typical components and potential locations for pressure sensors in a ventilator.
Source: https://allsensors.com/applications

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Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
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The Pressure in Tornadoes

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

The Pressure in Tornadoes

The pressure inside a tornado is less than the surrounding atmospheric pressure. That pressure differential causes flow into the tornado of objects such as cars, mobile homes, other structures and more (reference Dorothy and Toto). Since tornadoes travel and are only in a specific location for a short time, getting a pressure measurement inside the tornado is quite difficult, so the database is quite small. However, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) of the U.S. Department of Commerce, “A barometer can start dropping many hours or even days in advance of a tornado if there is low pressure on a broad scale moving into the area.” Of the measurements that have been made in the U.S., the lowest recorded pressure difference is 194 millibars. While it could be damaged like anything else sucked into a tornado, an All Sensors digital output ADO Series barometric pressure sensor could provide the measurement for indicating the pressure drop usually indicative of changing weather conditions.

Tornado (National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR))

This tornado formed during a large thunderstorm in Wyoming.
Source: National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR).

Comments/Questions?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
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Getting the Right Medical Room Pressure

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Getting the Right Medical Room Pressure

With airborne infectious diseases that can easily spread from one person to another, such as the COVID-19 virus, isolation is critical. In a hospital or clinic, an isolation room needs negative pressure to have airflow into the room and avoid pathogens, or germs, from escaping. In addition to viruses, other undesirable contaminants to keep away from the rest of the population and sterile equipment in a hospital include bacteria, fungi, yeasts, molds, pollens, gases, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), small particles and chemicals.

The airflow to create and maintain the negative pressure (vacuum) in the room requires a consistent pressure differential of about 0.01 inch water gauge (in. w.g.) or 2.5 Pascals (Pa).

According to the Facility Guidelines Institute’s (FGI’s) most recent 2018 FGI Guidelines ANSI/ASHRAE/ASHE Standard 170-2017, other rooms that should be negatively pressurized include:

  • Emergency Department Public Waiting Areas
  • Emergency Department Decontamination
  • Radiology Waiting Rooms
  • Triage
  • Bathrooms
  • Airborne Infection Isolation (AII) Rooms
  • Most Laboratory Work Areas
  • Autopsy Rooms
  • Soiled Workrooms or Soiled Holding Rooms
  • Soiled or Decontamination Rooms in Sterile Processing Department
  • Soiled Linen Sorting and Storage
  • Janitors’ Closets

In contrast, protecting the patient and sterile medical and surgical supplies in an operating room requires positive pressure to keep undesirable contaminants outside. The positive pressure room is achieved by pumping in filtered, clean air.

Isolation (Low) vs. operating room (High) pressure

Isolation (Low) vs. operating room (High) pressure.
Source: Minnesota Department of Health

In fact, some portable, headgear-mounted air purifying respirator systems use positive pressure to protect the wearer.

Comments/Questions?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
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The Pressure for Ventilators

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

The Pressure for Ventilators

In addition to the pressure to get more ventilators, pressure is an integral part of a ventilator’s operation. Breathing involves inspiratory (inhaling) pressure and expiratory (exhaling) pressure and a ventilator has to take the user’s values into account. Peak Inspiratory Pressure or PIP is the maximum pressure inside the lungs during each inhaled breath and the normal range is 25-30 cm H2O. Positive End Expiratory Pressure or PEEP is the amount of pressure left inside the lungs at the end of a breath to keep the alveoli, tiny air sacs of the lungs, open. The normal range is 3-5 cm H2O.

The pressure inside a patient’s lungs depends on the compliance of their lungs. While the suggested range of pressures during ventilation is 20-35 cm H2O with an absolute maximum of 40 cm H2O, someone with damaged lungs may need a higher pressure.

 

Airway pressure and flow waveforms during constant flow volume control ventilation show PEEP and PIP

Airway pressure and flow waveforms during constant flow volume control ventilation show PEEP and PIP.
Source: http://rc.rcjournal.com/content/59/11/1773/tab-figures-data

With pressures below 50 cm H2O (19.7 in H2O or 4,903 Pa) for dynamic measurements, a pressure sensor designed specifically for these low pressures, such as All Sensors’ DLC, DLLR, and others, provide the required accuracy.

Comments/Questions?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
Email us at info@allsensors.com