Tire Pressure: Not all Measurements are the Same

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities and you. In this blog we’ll look at tire pressure measurements.

Tire Pressure: Not all Measurements are the Same

The proper tire pressure in passenger cars and trucks provides optimum safety and efficiency.  Since drivers did not check tire pressures as frequently as they needed to, the U.S. Department of Transportation’s (DOT’s) National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) Transportation Recall Enhancement, Accountability, and Documentation (TREAD) Act of 2000 requires a tire pressure monitoring system (TPMS) on every new vehicle (all passenger cars and light trucks under 10,000 lbs. Gross Vehicle Weight) sold in the U.S. after November 2006.

Not all tire pressure measurements are the same. Car tire pressures are typically 30 to 35 psi with truck values running slightly higher. If you have an ATV, the tire pressure could be more like 8 psi max with some being as low as 2.7 psi and some as high as 10 psi. If you ride a road bicycle, the pressure can range considerably and depends on your weight with tire pressures of 95-105 psi for 110# riders to 125-135 psi for a 230# rider suggested from one source.

You can find tire pressure measurements in some unusual places. The Shipwreck water slide at SeaWorld uses large tires to carry several riders. The tire bumps into the sides of the slide to provide added excitement to the ride. For safety purposes, a maximum rating of 2.9 psi or 0.2 bar is recommended.

Shipwreck water slide uses large tires

The variety of tire pressure readings means that a single pressure sensor cannot provide the required accuracy and precision for all applications.

What do you think/Comments?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let me know and I’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
-Dan DeFalco, Marketing Manager, All Sensors Corporation (ddefalco@allsensors.com)

Welcome to All Sensors Blog

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog will bring out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities and you. This initial blog explores pressure sensing in weather measurements.

Barometric or air pressure – either rising or falling – indicates a change in weather and is usually included in weather reports with temperature, rain or snowfall and wind measurements. While the temperature, rain and wind information is quickly verified by just going outside, the pressure measurement is a longer term issue. The absolute pressure measurement in inches of mercury for the U.S. is typically about 30.00 for a steady reading depending on height above sea level. The rate and amount of a falling barometer indicates how quickly a storm will occur and its severity. Barometric pressure change may be several days or only a few hours before the weather front. Accurate and precise pressure measurements need to consistently resolve a rather small pressure range since the pressure drop or rise from a steady barometer is usually within 00.20 inches of mercury.

What do you think/Comments?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let me know and I’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
-Dan DeFalco, Marketing Manager, All Sensors Corporation (ddefalco@allsensors.com)