Optimal Pressure for Clean Teeth

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Optimal Pressure for Clean Teeth

While some electric toothbrushes use pulsating water jets or oral irrigators with water pressures between 10 to 100 psi, some ultrasonic technology toothbrushes now integrate a pressure sensor to avoid brushing too hard. With their built-in pressure sensors, Philips ProtectiveClean or DiamondClean Smart series of toothbrushes have at least three modes and three intensities.

If the user is brushing too hard, the toothbrush handle vibrates and makes a pulsing sound as a reminder to not exert as much pressure. Other toothbrush manufacturers, such as the Oral-B Genius Pro 8000, have also integrated pressure sensors into their toothbrushes. This indicates that users are receiving value and willing to pay more, sometimes a lot more, for these premium types of toothbrushes. With a pressure sensor, the user can optimize the cleaning process and avoid damage to gums and even teeth.

While manufacturers reveal no information about the pressures involved, a university study from the 1970s found that 19.53 gm/mm2 (191.5 kPa or 27.8 psi or 1437 mm Hg) ±6.48 gm/mm2 (63.55kPa or 9.22 psi or 477 mm Hg) typically resulted from using a hard bristle toothbrush with lower pressures for soft and powered toothbrushes.

Koninklijke Philips N.V.  Sonicare ProtectiveClean 6100

Figure courtesy of Koninklijke Philips N.V.

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Piezoresistive MEMS Pressure Sensors Growth

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Piezoresistive MEMS Pressure Sensors Growth

A new report is available for pressure sensors from MarketResearch titled, “Pressure Sensor Market by Technology Advancement, Growth and Forecasts 2027.”

Over the forecast period, increasing technological advancements in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology as well as the rising adoption of this technology in connected devices are key factors driving growth. Of the analyzed technologies of piezoresistive, electromagnetic, capacitive, resonant solid state, and optical, piezoresistive technology is expected to enjoy the highest share in the market during this timeframe. Factors inhibiting growth include technical problems in integration and packaging processes and lack of a standard fabrication process.

While the market is segmented into automotive, oil & gas, consumer electronics, medical, industrial sector, and others, consumer electronics are expected to register significant share of revenue growth over the forecast period.

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The Ups and Downs of Pressure

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

The Ups and Downs of Pressure

Higher and lower pressures can occur in what seem like unusual circumstances.  In plumbing, for example, much higher pressures occur if air gets into a water line and the faucet is closed quickly. Called water hammer, the effect causes audible noise or the banging of pipes. The hydraulic shock wave can, in some cases, cause severe damage since the pressure is so high. Draining the system is the usual solution to this problem.

On the down side, many people are surprised when they open a refrigerator door, close it and then try to immediately reopen it. The negative pressure in the refrigerator caused by this activity can be so extensive in well-sealed systems that it takes significant forced to re-open the door. The decreased pressure results from cooling of the warmer air entering the refrigerator. Based on ideal gas law, the pressure decrease could be 10% or more. In deep freezer units and those with the best sealing, the effect is even stronger producing even lower pressures.

Ideal gas law: P V = n R T

Where: P is the pressure, V is the volume occupied by n moles of any gas at temperature (T) in Kelvin and R is the gas constant.

Central Restaurant Products Walk-In Freezer

Walk In Freezer courtesy of Central Restaurant Products.

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Pressure to Heal

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Pressure to Heal

Applying pressure to a wound is the first step toward the healing process. This could be something as simple and commonplace as getting a vaccination or having blood taken where the pressure is simply applied by a finger. For a more life-threatening wound, a tourniquet might be required. But how much pressure should be applied?

Sufficient pressure needs to be applied to stop the flow of blood so clotting (occlusion) can occur. If blood flow cannot be stopped at the site, direct pressure to an artery may be required. For medical professionals, the term limb occlusion pressure (LOP) is used. This is “the minimum pressure required, at a specific time by a specific tourniquet cuff applied to a specific patient’s limb at a specific location, to stop the flow of arterial blood into the limb distal to the cuff.”

For hospitals an Automatic Tourniquet System provides a means of monitoring and controlling the applied pressure. In an operation, equipment such as the Zimmer A.T.S. 3000 uses LOP technology to sense, calculate and report the cuff pressure necessary for complete blood occlusion in the operative limb. Applied to the index finger or second toe of the patient’s operative limb prior to the surgical procedure, the LOP sensor in the A.T.S. 3000 provides a recommended tourniquet pressure (RTP) setting in approximately 30 seconds.

Zimmer’s A.T.S. 3000 Tourniquet System

Personalized Pressure™ Technology in Zimmer’s Tourniquet System, such this A.T.S. 3000, delivers the minimum amount of tourniquet pressure at a specific time, with a specific cuff, for a specific limb. Image courtesy of Zimmer Biomet.

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