Grease is the Word

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Grease is the Word

“I solve my problems and I’ll see the light.” Barry Gibb of the Bee Gees

You certainly can solve and prevent excessive wear problems by applying grease to maintenance points in many vehicles and moving industrial equipment in a timely manner. One of the easiest grease techniques is through Zerk fittings. Applying the grease requires either a manual or automatic grease gun that can generate sufficient pressure to make the grease flow into the fitting. The amount of pressure depends upon the viscosity of the grease, size of the opening and temperature of the grease.

SAE Grease FittingSource: SAE Products

Typical vehicle applications can have many fittings locations and use one or a variety of fittings. For a typical 1/8″ NPT fitting, a 3k psi rating is not uncommon and some are even rated around 6k psi.

For wellhead applications, high-pressure grease fittings with 9/16″ Autoclave style threads target 20,000 psi service and those with a Blowdown Fitting Style with 1/2” NPT target 10,000 psi service.

In any case, at these pressures, the entire flow path must be able to survive the maximum pressure expected in the specific application. This includes the gun itself, and any hose, connectors and relief valves. As in many cases, while the component’s capability is designed-in, it must be verified at some point by actual pressure testing.

High Pressure Valve Lubrication Gun

While not applicable for the complete range of these high-pressure tests, All Sensors’ CPA 602 Series media isolated ceramic amplified pressure sensors can address pressure measurements up to 6000 psi.

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The Value of Pressure

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

The Value of Pressure

Pressure makes diamonds” ― George S. Patton Jr.

While Patton was referring to the stress that can transition those who survive it into better individuals, carbon subjected to intense pressure and heat for millions of years turns into diamonds. In fact, the right combination of heat, pressure and time can crystallize many other minerals.

For natural diamonds, the pressure results from their formation at depths of 140 to 190 kilometers (87 to 118 mi) in the Earth’s mantle – below the Earth’s crust.

The Hope Diamond

The Hope Diamond

When Tracy Hall achieved the first commercially successful synthesis of diamond in 1954, a more specific pressure value was identified. Hall used a “belt” press, which was capable of producing pressures above 10 GPa (1,500,000 psi) and temperatures above 2,000 °C (3,630 °F).

Pressure is essential in creating diamonds and other precious gems, but its greatest value is in healthcare. Without your health, everything else means nothing. Blood pressure, respiratory flow, interocular pressure and other pressure measurements indicate good health or a health problem. Cost-effective microelectromechanical (MEMS) pressure sensors provide value by confirming good health or helping diagnose problems to correct them and restore good health.

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The Pressure in Hyperbaric Chamber Healing

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

The Pressure in Hyperbaric Chamber Healing

In Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT), a patient breathes 100% oxygen intermittently while inside a treatment chamber maintained at a pressure higher than sea level pressure (>1 atmosphere absolute). The patient inhales the oxygen within the chamber, where the pressurization could be 1.4 atmosphere absolute or higher.

HBOT can be a primary treatment or used to supplement surgical or pharmacologic approaches to healing. Specific medical uses include:

  1. Air or gas embolism
  2. Carbon monoxide poisoning
  3. Gas gangrene
  4. Crush Injuries, compartment syndrome (excessive pressure inside an enclosed muscle space in the body) and other acute traumatic ischemias (inadequate supply of blood to organs and body tissues)
  5. Decompression sickness
  6. Inadequate blood flow in arteries
  7. Severe anemia
  8. Intracranial abscess
  9. Dermatological disorders, such as Necrotizing Soft Tissue Infections
  10. Compromised grafts and flaps
  11. Acute thermal burn injury
  12. Sudden deafness

 

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT)Hyperbaric Oxygen Chamber (HBOT)

Effective HBOT treatment involves controlling three parameters: %O2, pressure, and time. While, mechanical analog gauges are the standard method for measuring pressure in commercially available hyperbaric chambers and are typically accurate only to within ±2% of full scale, digital pressure gauges with considerably greater accuracy and remote monitoring and control capability are being considered. A recent patent for a hyperbaric chamber suction system, including hyperbaric oxygen chamber, proposes the use of two electrically connected digital pressure gauges with an externally connected digital display as well as electrical solenoid valves and a programmable logic controller (PLC) to maintain desired pressure levels.

Comments/Questions?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
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Pressure Injury Prevention Day 2017

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Pressure Injury Prevention Day

Since 2013, the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (NPUAP) has striven to increase national awareness to prevent pressure ulcers. An event previously titled the World Wide Pressure Ulcer Prevention Day is now the World Wide Pressure Injury Prevention Day. This year, the World Wide Pressure Injury Prevention Day will be celebrated on November 16, 2017.

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Pressure ulcer injuries or bed sores occur due to bed-ridden and comatose patients lying in the same position for an extended period of time. Sensing the patient’s movement or pressure distribution change is among the techniques that can alert caregivers to assist the patient’s movement and avoid pressure ulcers.

The NPUAP redefined the definition of pressure injuries during the NPUAP 2016 Staging Consensus Conference held April 8-9, 2016 in Rosemont (Chicago), IL.

“A pressure injury is localized damage to the skin and underlying soft tissue usually over a bony prominence or related to a medical or other device. The injury can present as intact skin or an open ulcer and may be painful. The injury occurs as a result of intense and/or prolonged pressure or pressure in combination with shear.”

The stages of a pressure injury are:

  • Stage 1 Pressure Injury: Non-blanchable erythema of intact skin
  • Stage 2 Pressure Injury: Partial-thickness skin loss with exposed dermis
  • Stage 3 Pressure Injury: Full-thickness skin loss
  • Stage 4 Pressure Injury: Full-thickness skin and tissue loss

Pressure injuries also result from the use of medical devices designed and applied for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes.

Comments/Questions?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
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