All posts by Cynthia

Pressure for a Relaxing (and Safe) Experience

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Pressure for a Relaxing (and Safe) Experience

Traveling in a floating hotel, otherwise known as a cruise ship. can be a great way to relax and even experience some great adventures. However, things can happen to destroy what could be a once-in-a-lifetime experience. This includes a problem such as lack of water to any of the passenger’s cabins that is not resolved in a reasonable amount of time. Also, that same or possibly separate water supply needs to be available to provide water for the sprinkling system in the event that a fire should break out. As shown in this picture, the cruise ship designer makes it easy for maintenance people and others responsible for the safety systems on the ship to easily inspect the water supply system in various locations on the ship – so easy that even passengers can monitor the system themselves. However, for those locations to be remotely monitored, instead of a mechanical gauge, a sensor with an electrical output is required. Such a sensor would allow monitoring of numerous remote locations from the bridge without requiring anyone to go and inspect the gauges.

Cruise Ship Sprinkler System

With similar readings of 2.5 bar, the sprinkler system in Station 42 is OK.

In some marine sprinkler systems, a pressurized tank with a minimum of 4.5 bar is maintained for the highest level sprinkler. For any of these designs, one of All Sensors SPA 402 Series Pressure Sensors would provide a good solution for remote monitoring.

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Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
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Pressure in 3D Printing

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Pressure in 3D Printing

Different 3D printing processes include: stereolithography (SLA), selective laser sintering (SLS), binder jetting, poly-jet, fused deposition modelling(FDM)/fused filament fabrication (FFF) and more.

Depending on the type of material being used, the pressures involved to obtain sufficient and consistent material flow can be an issue. This is especially true for plastics. To understand the problems, researchers have tried to model the impact of different pressures in 3D printers.

In his master of science thesis, “Applying feedback control to improve 3D printing quality,” the author relates the error between an analytical solution and a computational-fluid-dynamics (CFD) solution to the steady-state non-Newtonian pipe flow problem (the fluid does not conform to Newton’s Law of Viscosity) for various pressures. See Table below.

Computational-Fluid-Dynamics (CFD) table

Source: “Applying feedback control to improve 3D printing quality.”

To improve the printing process, one company has already introduced a pressure-controlled 3D printer. The SLA Elemental printer utilizes a laser system to cure photosensitive resins, but unlike other SLA printers it uses a pressure control system to control resin levels when an 3D object is being built.

One of the benefits of pressure control in a 3D printer is a reduced need for print support structures where there is overhang in a 3D model. The pressure control allows the material surrounding the cured material to hold the build material in place long enough for the laser to cure the resin above it.

Comments/Questions?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
Email us at info@allsensors.com

The Pressure for Great Coffee

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

The Pressure for Great Coffee

If you are a coffee connoisseur, getting the right brew is essential. Besides fresh ground beans of a specific type, for many people an essential element in the brewing process is pressure.

In fact, by definition, espresso is brewed by passing high pressure water through the coffee. According to guidelines from the Istituto Nazionale Espresso Italiano, the entry water pressure is 9 ± 1 bar (130.5 ± 14.5 psi) , the entry water temperature is 88 ± 2°C and the coffee is brewed for 25 ± 2.5 s.

With these specific criteria, it is not surprising that coffee making machines were developed to ensure that the precise process is followed consistently. A commonly used coffee machine for commercial applications can easily cost thousands of dollars and it is not unusual for the machine to have a pressure indicating gage on it.

LaCimbali Coffee Machine

This LaCimbali coffee machine indicates 2 bar (29 psi), the incoming line pressure, with a maximum possible reading of 10 bar (145 psi).

Another brewing technique involving pressure is the Moka pot. This stove top or electric device uses steam pressure to push water through coffee grinds. Unlike an espresso machine, the pressure in a Moka pot is only about 1 bar (14.5 psi) and is assured by steam pressure, so no measurement would be involved.

The Keurig coffee machine automates a pressurized hot water process and precise quantity of coffee in pods to deliver a consistent brew to the user. The pressure is fixed and lower than an espresso machine but the user can select the amount of water to satisfy their taste buds. These machines are typically priced under $100 so there is no pressure indication to the consumer. However, the nozzle/needle can become clogged and then the machine shuts down and displays a ‘Water Under Pressure’ warning. Also, to ensure proper functioning at higher altitudes of 5,000 feet and above, some Keurig machines have a user selectable high altitude mode.

Comments/Questions?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
Email us at info@allsensors.com

The Pressure in Bubble Packs

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

The Pressure in Bubble Packs

Sort of a pre-inflated airbag system for fragile or even not so fragile products, Bubble Wrap® protects numerous shipments from in-transit and rough handling damage caused by shock, vibration or abrasion. These modern-day marvels are an array of small (¼-inch diameter) to rather large (1-inch diameter) air pockets sealed between two thin plastic layers.

Over 60 years ago, the inventors created bubble wrap by laminating two plastic sheets with air bubbles in between. Today, the company they founded, Sealed Air Corporation, provides several types of bubble wrap products for food handling, medical, electronics and other applications. Many of the products have unique properties for a specific application, such as anti-static material for electronics packaging.

The air pocket is created by a pressure of only a few psi above atmospheric pressure. However, with sufficient external pressure applied, the bubbles will pop, providing stress relief for an untold number of users.

Sealed Air Corporation Bubble Pack

Source: Sealed Air Corporation https://sealedair.com/

Comments/Questions?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
Email us at info@allsensors.com