Monthly Archives: November 2017

The Pressure in Hyperbaric Chamber Healing

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

The Pressure in Hyperbaric Chamber Healing

In Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT), a patient breathes 100% oxygen intermittently while inside a treatment chamber maintained at a pressure higher than sea level pressure (>1 atmosphere absolute). The patient inhales the oxygen within the chamber, where the pressurization could be 1.4 atmosphere absolute or higher.

HBOT can be a primary treatment or used to supplement surgical or pharmacologic approaches to healing. Specific medical uses include:

  1. Air or gas embolism
  2. Carbon monoxide poisoning
  3. Gas gangrene
  4. Crush Injuries, compartment syndrome (excessive pressure inside an enclosed muscle space in the body) and other acute traumatic ischemias (inadequate supply of blood to organs and body tissues)
  5. Decompression sickness
  6. Inadequate blood flow in arteries
  7. Severe anemia
  8. Intracranial abscess
  9. Dermatological disorders, such as Necrotizing Soft Tissue Infections
  10. Compromised grafts and flaps
  11. Acute thermal burn injury
  12. Sudden deafness

 

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT)Hyperbaric Oxygen Chamber (HBOT)

Effective HBOT treatment involves controlling three parameters: %O2, pressure, and time. While, mechanical analog gauges are the standard method for measuring pressure in commercially available hyperbaric chambers and are typically accurate only to within ±2% of full scale, digital pressure gauges with considerably greater accuracy and remote monitoring and control capability are being considered. A recent patent for a hyperbaric chamber suction system, including hyperbaric oxygen chamber, proposes the use of two electrically connected digital pressure gauges with an externally connected digital display as well as electrical solenoid valves and a programmable logic controller (PLC) to maintain desired pressure levels.

Comments/Questions?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
Email us at info@allsensors.com

Pressure Injury Prevention Day 2017

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Pressure Injury Prevention Day

Since 2013, the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (NPUAP) has striven to increase national awareness to prevent pressure ulcers. An event previously titled the World Wide Pressure Ulcer Prevention Day is now the World Wide Pressure Injury Prevention Day. This year, the World Wide Pressure Injury Prevention Day will be celebrated on November 16, 2017.

54

Pressure ulcer injuries or bed sores occur due to bed-ridden and comatose patients lying in the same position for an extended period of time. Sensing the patient’s movement or pressure distribution change is among the techniques that can alert caregivers to assist the patient’s movement and avoid pressure ulcers.

The NPUAP redefined the definition of pressure injuries during the NPUAP 2016 Staging Consensus Conference held April 8-9, 2016 in Rosemont (Chicago), IL.

“A pressure injury is localized damage to the skin and underlying soft tissue usually over a bony prominence or related to a medical or other device. The injury can present as intact skin or an open ulcer and may be painful. The injury occurs as a result of intense and/or prolonged pressure or pressure in combination with shear.”

The stages of a pressure injury are:

  • Stage 1 Pressure Injury: Non-blanchable erythema of intact skin
  • Stage 2 Pressure Injury: Partial-thickness skin loss with exposed dermis
  • Stage 3 Pressure Injury: Full-thickness skin loss
  • Stage 4 Pressure Injury: Full-thickness skin and tissue loss

Pressure injuries also result from the use of medical devices designed and applied for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes.

Comments/Questions?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
Email us at info@allsensors.com