Monthly Archives: February 2016

Wind Pressure in Caves

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities and you. In this blog we’ll be discussing wind pressure in caves.

Wind Pressure in Caves

Caves can have a somewhat mysterious property of blowing wind. Some are more obvious than others. For example, the Wind Cave in the National Park in South Dakota has been known to blow a person’s hat off on one day and then suck the hat in the next day. The change of direction and wind on an otherwise calm day are the result of the difference in atmospheric pressure between the cave and the surface.

The air pressure system in a cave is constantly changing to be equal to the air pressure system on the surface. An external high pressure system forces air into the cave to create a high pressure system in the cave. Conversely, an external low pressure system with high pressure in the cave forces air out to achieve a low pressure system in the cave. Called cave breathing, the speed of the air movement can increase significantly for a large cave with a narrow opening like the Wind Cave due to the Bernoulli Effect.  For both internal and external measurements, a 100 kPa pressure sensor in both locations can help predict the direction and force of the resulting wind.

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The narrow opening of Wind Cave in South Dakota causes surprising winds. Courtesy of the National Park Services.

What do you think/Comments?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let me know and I’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
-Han Mai, Senior Marketing Specialist, All Sensors Corporation (hmai@allsensors.com)

NEW Media Isolated Millivolt Pressure Sensors

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities and you. In this blog we’ll be discussing our new media isolated pressure sensors.

NEW Media Isolated Millivolt Pressure Sensors

All Sensors has a brand new offering of media isolated pressure sensors. The first line released is the ceramic CPM 602 Series. These new pressure sensors offer design engineers excellent performance in various applications, especially for low-cost solutions.

Product Features

  • Pressure ranges 30 to 6000 psi gauge
  • Piezoresistive monolithic
  • Excellent chemical resistance
  • Supply voltage 2 to 30 VDC
  • Total error better 4% FS

Applications

  • Medical
  • Environmental Controls
  • Plant and Mechanical Engineering
  • Automotive

See more information here. Datasheet download here.

What do you think/Comments?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let me know and I’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
-Han Mai, Senior Marketing Specialist, All Sensors Corporation (hmai@allsensors.com)

Special Uses for Pressure Sensors: Improve Your Game

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities and you. In this blog we’ll be discussing pressure towards golf.

Special Uses for Pressure Sensors: Improve Your Game

With sufficient knowledge of an application’s requirements, experts can implement sensors that help experienced or novice players improve their game. An excellent example comes from golf. Avid golfers are always looking for ways to reduce their score and increase their performance and enjoyment of the game.

One company employs several pressure sensors in a golf glove to help users develop the right grip. With the aid of a 1.2-inch built-in display, the glove analyzes the pressure of the swing for real-time audio and visual feedback at 80 times per second. Experts know that a relaxed grip is the key to a powerful, consistent and natural golf swing. The glove warns users if they exceed a target level of grip pressure and even shows which fingers are gripping too tightly. Perhaps the biggest surprise is that an app or smartphone are not required to provide this capability. Makes you want to get your hands around other problems where sensing could provide a solution.

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The right grip pressure improves performance in golf. Image courtesy of SensoGlove. 

What do you think/Comments?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let me know and I’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
-Han Mai, Senior Marketing Specialist, All Sensors Corporation (hmai@allsensors.com)