Pressure Injury Prevention Day 2017

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Pressure Injury Prevention Day

Since 2013, the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (NPUAP) has striven to increase national awareness to prevent pressure ulcers. An event previously titled the World Wide Pressure Ulcer Prevention Day is now the World Wide Pressure Injury Prevention Day. This year, the World Wide Pressure Injury Prevention Day will be celebrated on November 16, 2017.

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Pressure ulcer injuries or bed sores occur due to bed-ridden and comatose patients lying in the same position for an extended period of time. Sensing the patient’s movement or pressure distribution change is among the techniques that can alert caregivers to assist the patient’s movement and avoid pressure ulcers.

The NPUAP redefined the definition of pressure injuries during the NPUAP 2016 Staging Consensus Conference held April 8-9, 2016 in Rosemont (Chicago), IL.

“A pressure injury is localized damage to the skin and underlying soft tissue usually over a bony prominence or related to a medical or other device. The injury can present as intact skin or an open ulcer and may be painful. The injury occurs as a result of intense and/or prolonged pressure or pressure in combination with shear.”

The stages of a pressure injury are:

  • Stage 1 Pressure Injury: Non-blanchable erythema of intact skin
  • Stage 2 Pressure Injury: Partial-thickness skin loss with exposed dermis
  • Stage 3 Pressure Injury: Full-thickness skin loss
  • Stage 4 Pressure Injury: Full-thickness skin and tissue loss

Pressure injuries also result from the use of medical devices designed and applied for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes.

Comments/Questions?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
Email us at info@allsensors.com

The Pressure for Healthy Teeth

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

The Pressure for Healthy Teeth

Pulsating dental water jets or oral irrigators have been used for dental healthcare for over 50 years. The pulsating stream of water and special tips provide a treatment for braces, sensitive teeth, plaque and gingivitis. One manufacturer offers countertop water flossers with 3, 6, or 10 pressure settings ranging from 10–90 or 10-100 PSI and cordless water flossers with 2 or 3 pressure settings from 45–75 PSI.

Water Flossers - Countertop vs. Cordless

The pressure range and adjustability vary depending on the type of water flosser.

With the lowest (1) setting of 10 PSI and the highest (10) setting of 100 PSI, the ten adjustments steps on one model provide approximately 10 psi increments between steps. The user does not have to relate to the actual pressure but just know that if they have sensitive teeth they want to start with the #1 step (10 psi). Experienced users often use the higher-pressure settings. Since the pressure settings are all relative, a pressure sensor is not required in the flosser. However, as in any product that involves pressure, the design pressures need to be verified by laboratory testing to establish the typical and maximum pressure settings and verified in manufacturing for consistent quality using highly accurate pressure sensors.

Comments/Questions?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
Email us at info@allsensors.com

Steam Pressure

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Steam Pressure

Today, displacing gasoline or diesel powered engines by electrically-powered motors is the goal of extensive renewable energy efforts. Before the fossil fuel powered machines, the steam engine powered the Industrial Revolution and dominated industry and transportation for 150 years with coal providing the primary fuel to heat the water in the boiler.

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A scaled down model train that uses steam power.

Live steam or steam under pressure created by boiling water is still used to operate some machinery and has a cult following in scale model trains. For safety purposes, the engineer monitors the pressure in the boiler.  The pressure is measured by a mechanical gauge and controlled by a safety valve that relieves excessive pressure. Typical operating pressures are in the 200 to 250 psi range. In these trains, any digital sensing technique would be quite out of place.

Inner Workings of a Steam Engine

Several pressure measurements can be made for the engineer to safely control the steam engine.

Comments/Questions?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
Email us at info@allsensors.com

Progression of MEMS Pressure Sensing

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

At Sensors Expo 2017, Jim Brownell, one of All Sensors’ sales managers, explained the progression of microelectromechanical system (MEMS) pressure sensing over the past 30+ years from All Sensors’ perspective.

Check out that interview here, courtesy of EE World Online’s Sensor Tips.

 

Comments/Questions?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
Email us at info@allsensors.com