The Pressures of a Modern Lifestyle

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

The Pressures of a Modern Lifestyle

After a restful night’s sleep, possibly in a water (<<28 mmHg) bed or on an air (<1 psi) mattress, the day begins with the flushing of a toilet, washing of hands and a relaxing shower. All these daily routines need adequate water pressure (40 to 45 psi). More water pressure is needed to get the filtered water (20-40 psi) for coffee. In many cases, the coffee is made by a pressurized (130.5 ± 14.5 psi) coffee/expresso machine. Before leaving home, a pressurized (10-100 psi) water-powered toothbrush could be used to clean the teeth.

The trip to work or wherever in a personal vehicle would almost always require riding on pressurized rubber tires whether it is a car, truck, motorcycle or even a bicycle (< 135 psi). If the vehicle is a car with an internal combustion engine, cylinder pressure provides the power to propel it and, in some cases, a turbocharger provides even more input air pressure. Hydraulic pressure provides the braking (800-2000 psi) and steering (80-125 psi).

Back at home after whatever the day has meant, it is cool thanks to the air conditioning compressor (<100 to >345 psi) and air delivery by the fan (1-in water column) through a clean air filter (<250 Pa). To relax, a pressurized bottle of liquid, perhaps a soda (30-50 psi), beer (<45 psi) or even sparkling wine (70-90 psi) is in order. With the stress of the day behind, your blood pressure (120/80 mmHg) and breathing (respiratory pressure) are probably the lowest they have been all day. Of course, the entire day occurred in atmospheric pressure whether it was near the ocean (14.7 psi) or in a mountain cabin at 1 mile above sea level (6.9 psi).

As another round of flushing, washing and brushing ends the day, the typical person is unaware of the value pressure has meant to their day to increase comfort, convenience and safety as well as save time and provide essential well-being. If they wanted to measure, monitor or control any of these or many other pressures, All Sensors has the pressure sensors to do the job.

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Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
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The Pressure for a Tasty Frozen Treat

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

The Pressure for a Tasty Frozen Treat

A trip to one of today’s modern frozen custard or other specialty frozen treat stores often includes more than just the end item. Some of these stores proudly display of the equipment/ machine they use and it’s quite informative or at least consumes time, while customers for their orders. While you might think temperature is one of the primary control parameters, if you look closely at the gauges, you’ll see they  measure pressure. The one on the left measures suction pressure and the one on the right measures head pressure. For these types of machines to be part of the Internet of Things (IoT), they will need to have sensors with an electrical output that can provide a signal for wireless transmission to someone monitoring the machine’s process. This could be the manufacturer of the machine, especially if it still under warranty, a local operator or the owner of the facility whose concern is that the machines operate within their specified parameters and don’t experience unusual down time.

Pressure Gauges Monitoring the Frozen Custard Process

Two pressure gauges monitor the frozen custard process.

Another frozen specialty treat company shows the machine and some interesting details regarding its process. To have a pressure sensor with an electrical output that can be easily interfaced to a microcontroller and provide the signal that could be transmitted wirelessly, one of  All Sensors SPA 402 Series Pressure Sensors would be a good starting point to evaluate a modern monitoring approach.

 

A single pressure gauge is used in this frozen treat machine.

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Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
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Pressure for a Relaxing (and Safe) Experience

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Pressure for a Relaxing (and Safe) Experience

Traveling in a floating hotel, otherwise known as a cruise ship. can be a great way to relax and even experience some great adventures. However, things can happen to destroy what could be a once-in-a-lifetime experience. This includes a problem such as lack of water to any of the passenger’s cabins that is not resolved in a reasonable amount of time. Also, that same or possibly separate water supply needs to be available to provide water for the sprinkling system in the event that a fire should break out. As shown in this picture, the cruise ship designer makes it easy for maintenance people and others responsible for the safety systems on the ship to easily inspect the water supply system in various locations on the ship – so easy that even passengers can monitor the system themselves. However, for those locations to be remotely monitored, instead of a mechanical gauge, a sensor with an electrical output is required. Such a sensor would allow monitoring of numerous remote locations from the bridge without requiring anyone to go and inspect the gauges.

Cruise Ship Sprinkler System

With similar readings of 2.5 bar, the sprinkler system in Station 42 is OK.

In some marine sprinkler systems, a pressurized tank with a minimum of 4.5 bar is maintained for the highest level sprinkler. For any of these designs, one of All Sensors SPA 402 Series Pressure Sensors would provide a good solution for remote monitoring.

Comments/Questions?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
Email us at info@allsensors.com

Pressure in 3D Printing

Welcome to All Sensors “Put the Pressure on Us” blog. This blog brings out pressure sensor aspects in a variety of applications inspired by headlines, consumer and industry requirements, market research, government activities, and you.

Pressure in 3D Printing

Different 3D printing processes include: stereolithography (SLA), selective laser sintering (SLS), binder jetting, poly-jet, fused deposition modelling(FDM)/fused filament fabrication (FFF) and more.

Depending on the type of material being used, the pressures involved to obtain sufficient and consistent material flow can be an issue. This is especially true for plastics. To understand the problems, researchers have tried to model the impact of different pressures in 3D printers.

In his master of science thesis, “Applying feedback control to improve 3D printing quality,” the author relates the error between an analytical solution and a computational-fluid-dynamics (CFD) solution to the steady-state non-Newtonian pipe flow problem (the fluid does not conform to Newton’s Law of Viscosity) for various pressures. See Table below.

Computational-Fluid-Dynamics (CFD) table

Source: “Applying feedback control to improve 3D printing quality.”

To improve the printing process, one company has already introduced a pressure-controlled 3D printer. The SLA Elemental printer utilizes a laser system to cure photosensitive resins, but unlike other SLA printers it uses a pressure control system to control resin levels when an 3D object is being built.

One of the benefits of pressure control in a 3D printer is a reduced need for print support structures where there is overhang in a 3D model. The pressure control allows the material surrounding the cured material to hold the build material in place long enough for the laser to cure the resin above it.

Comments/Questions?
Do you have a pressure sensing question? Let us know and we’ll address it in an upcoming blog.
Email us at info@allsensors.com